Building 50 bookcases. Have certain requirements for the plans.

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I'm just curious if you have worked out the amount of space required to manufacture, assemble, finish, cure and store all of these shelves, prior to installation? That's a lot of space, just for drying racks for endcaps coated with Waterlox. Consider also the installation sequence for the rest of the retail space. You have floors to put down, too.
Were it me, I think that, as early as possible, I'd try a prototype all the way through to the final installation phase. Then I'd take the plan and sample out to bid with a couple of good, preferably local, cabinet and/or millwork suppliers. Just for a reality check.
There are economies of scale with equipment, staff and skills...
Waterlox _is_ pretty, though.
Patriarch
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S. Dees wrote:

Have you considered using a separate, inclined shelf or easel placed on a standard bookshelf?
Something like this: http://xylemdesign.com/Easels/DisplayEasels/TableTopEasels/OakBookstandBig.asp
R, Tom Q.
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Tom Quackenbush wrote:

Did you note the price? I know the OP would be making them or having them made but $50?
Josie
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firstjois wrote:

I hadn't noticed, but you're right - that's pretty steep. Maybe I can quit my day job ...
I envisioned something a little more utilitarian for the OP. 1/4" ply, a little more vertical than the one in the picture and the same width as the bookcase.
R, Tom Q.
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Tom Quackenbush wrote:

Even in real oak - $50?
Just surprised me!
Josie
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Actually it would have been a great idea if I just wanted to do it for 10 or 15 shelves. I could knock them off pretty quick and they would have been pretty easy to move around. (I still might make a few.) The problem is doing that for 50 bookcase with an average of 7 shelves each means about 350 easels. Even if I only did it for only one per bookcase, that's still 50 easels and a heck of a lot of wood. I may still do a few. Thanks for the suggestion. Sean.

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Wed, Nov 17, 2004, 6:36am snipped-for-privacy@kingcon.com (TomQuackenbush) asks: Have you considered using a separate, inclined shelf or easel placed on a standard bookshelf?
Damn, what do they do, price those by the ounce? A bit pricey, thinkist I.
Be plenty easy to make a whole batch of those out of plywood, and wouldn't even need the real expensive stuff. And one, or two pieces on the back, to angle it, would be all you'd need. Glue 'em up, then slap a coat or two of poly on 'em. Probably just a buck or two if you used plywood.
In fact, I just thought of a design for a knock down model, using 3 pieces of plywood. If you wanted any speed making them, you'd need a router, or if you weren't in a huge hurry, could use a scrollsaw.
Personally, I wouldn't screw around with stuff like that. People buying books won't care. Just put the new ones out on tables. Apparently that's what they did with the latest Harry Potter book, in this area, and no one complained. I've seen new release books stacked over a dozen high in bookstores on tables. No prob.
JOAT Measure twice, cut once, swear repeatedly.
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This does -not- directly address the actual question you asked, but....
Have you considered the "Lazy Man's Solution(tm)" to the basic problem? To wit: 1) "standard design" bookcases 2) some 1x2 stock, in various lengths
Where you want to have books 'face out', you simply lay down (loose!) a strip of appropriate length along the back of the shelf. Then stack the books in, bottom of the book against the 'spacer', top of the book against the back of the case. Voila! Books lean back, so they won't 'jump off the shelf'.
Do the dimensions right, and you can use the _same_ spacer for full-size hardbounds and paperbacks, simply by rotating the stick,
Note: the 'spacer' doesn't even have to be wood -- a piece of cardboard, folded into a triangular tube also does the job. And you've got a continuing source of _that_ in the cartons books are sent to you in. Hard to argue about 'free' materials. <grin>
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I've seen retailers build their own cases before and they concentrated on fine materials and simple design.
You might consider using a "stop" piece on the front of the shelf. This would serve the same purpose as the slant in terms of keeping the books on the shelf.
But the title edge would not be slanted up toward the eye so that may be a key factor also.
If doing that many bookcases I think I would rip all the parts on a good table saw and then mark the angle slots on the sides. Then I would put a dado on a radial arm and cut the dados for the sloping groove.
There are many great woods available if you are inclined to make a statement with the cases. You might even sell some cases!
Good luck to you and give the big box boys a run for their money!
RonT
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Thanks for the support! I figure that it won't be too hard to do all of them once I get going, and figure out exactly what I am doing. Cut 20 or 30 pairs of sides at a time. Cut all 350 shelves at the same time. Etc, Etc. Tremendous time-saving advantages. Sean

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Watch out for repetitive strain injuries though. And for accidents because you fall asleep.
--
mare

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I'm with the crowd that suggests regular bookshelves with "insert" bookshelves that are full depth, have a back, and an angled bottom for the "specials" you wish to display.
Option 2, you can have everything stored spines out, with a row of "special" books in stands above where they are located. (single book holder with a bar or something to prevent casual removal, and a sign that says "see below" or possible "4th shelf from top")
Personally, while browsing dvds this past weekend, I thought it's be nice to have a scan of the front/back cover stored in a database for "browsing" the stacks... A public access computer linked (read only) to your current inventory would be great... possibly with a shelf location returned along with the other info on the book. In the books case, you might include scans of the inside covers on books where info on that book is kept. Keep a FAQ page for the store on that computer as well. (I am happier when i can help myself to information rather than having to find someon and then wait for them to be free.)
Good luck!
--
be safe.
flip
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