Bugger, bugger, bugger

G'day all, What a shit of a way to end a good day. I have been making the bench tops for the new kitchen and things went extremely smooth. Had to place 2 joins in the laminate and both turned out as near to perfect as you can get. Contacted the laminate in place and all that was left was to trim it flush. Grabbed a new flush trim router bit and away I went everything going so well that something HAD to HAPPEN. and it bloody well did !! The flaming bearing collapsed on the cutter and a nice 3mm chunk was routed out of the front edge of the top. After much swearing, I mean a lot of swearing, no I really mean a Bloody Lot of swearing I settled down and thought it through. Grabbed a straight edge and clamped it onto the top, put a 19mm bit into the router and took 3mm of the edge. Turned out OK, but will see if it is noticeable when the timber edge is put in place. Top is on the cabinets so it's time for well deserved beer.
Regards John
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I believe the difference between a decent woodworker and a great woodworker is what he does AFTER he makes a mistake. Sounds like you took the high road even if the mistake wasn't yours. Good save.
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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[snipped here and there for brevity]

of a solid surface sink into the deck by 2". That was an expensive Amana bit, so it is not just the cheap bits that drop their bearings.
Now I only use trimming routers with a bearing attached to the base, not the bit.
r
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Robatoy wrote:
> The flaming bearing collapsed on the cutter and a nice 3mm chunk was > routed out of the front edge of the top.
Robotoy followed:
> Been there, done that.
Me to. Have become a great believer in LocTite.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yabbut..in one case it didn't come off, the bearing just disintegrated. Them little wee bearings @ 22,000 RPM with 3.5 HP and a 200 pound (plus) guy in a hurry,... well.. it is bound to happen... or so I'm told. The only thing the LocTite will assure, is that the screw is still neatly in place after the carnage. Sometimes the laminate will jam itself between the bearing and the cutters, creating all kinds of havoc... again, or so I'm told.
This works nicely: http://www.pinske-edge.com/ then click on tool catalogue, then search and enter #2800 into the search window. Stupid money, mind you, but easily fabricated.
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Robatoy wrote:

http://www.pinske-edge.com/catalog/catalog.htm
You're right ... they have a VERY high opinion of the value of their merchandise.
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On Sun, 26 Nov 2006 08:42:53 GMT, John B

Well, the flames didn't hint at there being a problem? ;)
-Leuf
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I just saw your append - I made my kitchen counter tops this way the first time. Laminate, then wood edge. Problem is that water and gunk gets into the crack between the laminate and the timber. Now I put the wood on first, level it to the substrate and then put the laminate on top. Run a round over bit afterwards and it looks MUCH better, plus it keeps the water out of the crack.
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robm wrote:

Yep, Your method was exactly what I intended to do. Un-fortunately the top had to be made in 2 pieces so as to get it into the kitchen. To reduce the problem of the joint between laminate and timber edge, I sealed the the edge with a couple of coats of poly as well as the back of the timber. Gave the timber edging 3 coats of poly before installing it. Once it was was installed I masked of the laminate and applied another three coats of wipe on poly allowing as much as possible run into the joint.
Someone once said "Life is a Compromise" :)
regards John
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