Buffing Polyurethane


hey, I am doing a shelf in Cypress Pine, I want a nice (really) nice smooth finish. With a lambswool pad on the random orbital sander, do I need anything as a buffing agent?? I have never gone for this level of finish before and would appreciate a word on the best ay to achieve something other than disaster. thanks, Jock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
* where 'ay' = way. keyboard is half broke! Jock

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will probably want to gently sand it or wet sand it with something on the order of 1200-1500 grit paper. This will knock down any dust nibs or other small imperfections. It will also kill the shine if you've applied a gloss finish. You can then buff it back up with automotive rubbing compound (either by hand or with a buffer) to bring back the shine. That would give you a finish that is as smooth as glass.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Walmart sells it. Now if you can get it to work on a car, with or without a m/c, let me know.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net says...

imperfections and/or if a bit of dust settled while drying. After the final coat AND AFTER IT IS COMPLETELY DRY I wet sand with 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper. Then I use my random orbital sander with a pad and do the final polish with it and rottenstone. I use a light oil to hold the powdered rottenstone in place. It gives a really nice, velvety smooth finish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks all for the ideas, I have some winter cool at the moment so I have lots of time to decide which method to try... like watching paint dry 'round here! Thanks again, Jock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jock wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If not, I'd sand it to 600 or so and then go over it with a polisher like ultra sheen or something... that brings it up to maybe 2400 grit... Then buff the heck out of it, with a good 3 wheel system like the Beall, if possible.. YMWV Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the factory finish is not in very bad shape - which is to say, no gouges, only surface scratches, I would not go as abrasive as 600. 1500 is plenty abrasive enough for surfaces scratches. Any rubbing compound or the like will then take it up to any luster desired. If the surface scratches are quite minor, I would not even hit it with 1500. Just use a compound. 600 is really a tooth grit. You want it for primers and such where tooth is desired.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mac, I have one coat on, still drying :( because it's quite cold here at present. I finish sanded with 400 on my random orbital, I will probably go the fine sand (600 or better) between coats and reapply the poly till a deep finish is achieved. I turned some Mulga ( an aussie desert type hardwood) for a chisel handle and sanded it then put the pure beeswax into it on the lathe then used a piece of western red cedar as a friction block melting the wax into the spinning piece. With a buff to finish it (a dry cloth) it came up with an amazing lustre. I only have sanders to use on this shelf project, not anything more tooly than a lambswool pad on the r/o sander so I will persevere with this new info.. Thanks for all the comments guys, much appreciated. Jock

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: hey, : I am doing a shelf in Cypress Pine, I want a nice (really) nice smooth : finish. With a lambswool pad on the random orbital sander, do I need : anything as a buffing agent?? I have never gone for this level of finish : before and would appreciate a word on the best ay to achieve something other : than disaster.
The don't use polyurethane -- it's not very good for buffing (it's tough, but not hard enough to buff well -- think rubber tire).
Both lacquer and shellac can be taken to a high polish -- using either pumice and rottenstone, or a series of automotive polishing compounds.
You could also use an oil finish, let it cure, the use the Beall buffing system.
    -- Andy Barss
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.