BT3100 saw - reasons not to buy one ?

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And that is the best summary. I really like mine because it does what I want it to do. But it definitely won't do what some others may want it to do (a la Watson's humorous but on-target post)

have the cabinet saw? <g>
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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IMHO, while Hitachi and Makita portables are available, it's a no-brainer to me. And, I've beaten on such a Hitachi for 7 years. So far, all the Ryobi tools I've encountered are kinda "light in the loafers."
J
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I was in a tool repair store once talking to the guy who did the work, and noticed a Ryobi tool on the bench. I asked him about it, and he said that he got at least one of their tools a week to repair. I have had a used Unisaw that I got for $1,000 for 12 years, which hasn't been used heavily (less than 200 hrs. per year) and the only thing I have ever done to it is change the blades. Rather than the Ryobi, I would shop the garage and estate sales, and tool section of the want adds for something better. robo hippy
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snipped-for-privacy@sme-online.com wrote:

If you are going to be using it as a portable and beating on it, I agree. This saw is not well suited (IMHO) as one you throw in the bed of a truck and stick a cinder block under a leg to get it nearly level before working with it. As an inexpensive solution for a shop saw, I think it is great. But not as a job site saw.
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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spending over $200 for a motor once in a while?" Geez.
For about the price of the motor, you can get a nice used contractors saw. It will be more durable, precise, and powerful. Any you won't ever have to replace the motor.
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ever used one? Or is this just based on how it looks compared to how you think a saw should look? There are lots of people/uses for which this saw would be a poor choice. I guess that list needs to be expanded to include people who are concerned with the visual image a saw projects! <g>
There may be perfectly legitimate reasons that a used contractor saw may be a better choice for some (or even "most"; I won't quibble about the fraction) people. To me, "looks like a REAL tool" is not high on my priority list.
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Look at it this way, if you buy a brand new fully loaded car and then try to tow an 6000lb trailer then don't bitch when the transmission breaks.
Just look at it; it is a toy. "Will you mind spending over $3000 for a transmission once in a while?" Geez.
Of course, using your logic, for the price of the transmission you could have bought an 10 year old base model truck that would tow this trailer admirably.
The point I'm making, of course, is that the choice should be made based the intended application and desired features. The BT has a rich set of features that make it safe, easy to use and very accurate at an excellent price point. It is most definately intended for light use and as Tom points out he is most definately a "home boy". If this fits the requirements I don't see what the problem is.
Oh, and by the way, if you don't like the saw you can dismantle it and sell it as spares and recoup most, if not all, of your original purchase price. Now try doing that with a Unisaw!
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In spite of what others may say because they only buy $3000 pieces of machinery, its an excellent saw for the price. I love mine and have no regrets at all for having bought it. I too am a hobbiest with needs similar to yours and this saw fits my needs perfectly. John
matthew silver wrote:

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I like mine but I wanted a light weight but belt drive saw for occasional ripping duty. My Hitachi miter saw can do most everything else. The blade that comes with it is actually pretty decent and so is the fence. I got mine on sale at $199 and a $50 rebate and nothing else was close in the price range. If you hurry Amazon has a deal going on purchase depending on the purchase amount and for example you could get a Delta TS350 for $314.99 shipped which is getting some pretty good reviews for a lower priced table saw. --- Steve
(Amazon.com product link shortened)38937354/sr=1-4/ref=sr_1_4/102-4501249-1212153?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013

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I've had one for about three years and like it fine. It's in my garage shop, next to much more expensive tools that I use more often (jointer, planer, band saw, etc.). For my needs it was a perfect combination of price point and features at a quality level that has yielded no problems at all. I build only furniture and don't use the table saw nearly as often as the band saw, but for my purposes the Ryobi has been great.
-kiwanda
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Read what the cult-like following had to say about what they would change:
http://www.bt3central.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_IDG26
One owner has gone to the trouble of completely redesigning the riving knife/blade guard/anti-kickback pawl assembly. (http://www.leestyron.com /) Since he's now selling his design adapted to other saws, that con isn't unique to the BT3100. There are various other workarounds.
I think some of the people who've had trouble aligning the saw or keeping it aligned got lemons, so quality control might be a con. I move mine around the shop a bit and take the rip fence and sliding table off and put them back on and everything stays square. If you get one, test it out and take it back if it won't align readily or hold alignment.
I personally would prefer metal over plastic for the blade height/angle handwheel. I would also prefer two separate handwheels. I would like the table flat, instead of ribbed, and deeper, with more infeed table space. But I wouldn't give up the riving knife and sliding table and good dust collection and small footprint and $200-$300 more dollars to get a contractor saw that had metal handwheels and a smooth table.
Don't forget you can buy it, assemble it, and test it out on the kinds of cuts you're planning to make. If it works for you, you have saved $$$. If not, return it, you're only out one weekend's worth of shop time.
--
Jerry

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