Bringing wires through a desk top

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For a built-in writing desk I am just completing, I need to find a way to bring some wires for a lamp, telephone, etc. through the desk top. It's gonna kill me to have to take a hole saw and put a one and a quarter inch hole through this nicely finished desk top, but I can't think of a more graceful way of doing it.
Does anyone here have any suggestions? The back and sides of the desk fit fairly tightly into an alcove, so there's no way to just drape wires down the back or sides.
Any ideas will be appreciated.
Thanks,
-vs-
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Check at Rockler (rockler.com), Woodcraft (woodcraft.com), and Woodworkers Hardware (wwhardware.com) -- all three sell grommets of various types and sizes for exactly this purpose.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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http://woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid 71
http://www.rockler.com/search_results.cfm?filter=grommet
http://www.officedepot.com/textSearch.do ;jsessionid00CLUQSSEJ3FKRFCZJA5GDEXA:uhas9jq7?uniqueSearchFlag=true&Ntt=grommet
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I faced exactly the same issue (with regard to angst) on a desk. It was a commercial desk but the concerns for the finish were the same. Rockler had the widest range of sizes and high quality finishes in desk grommets. I installed three antique brass finish grommets and they came out very nicely. I used a plunge router with a circle cutting jig. It worked well. If doing it today, I might consider using a high quality forstner bit instead, but the router was definitely a reliable method that was easily repeatable. The one thing I would do differently is attach a piece of wood below the proposed hole to help hold the disk of wood that comes loose when you use a router.
Bob
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"Virgil Smith" wrote in message

I do this regularly when drilling unexpected holes for wiring, etc., through expensive cabinets that were just built.
My preferred method is to drill a small pilot hole then, starting on the visible side first, use a good Forstner bit, _from both sides_, to complete the hole. Insert a grommet made for this specific purpose to fill the hole.
(Make sure you size the bit for the grommet you buy, or vice versa)
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 5/14/05
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complete
hole.
I like your approach the best of all I've read, when a grommet is the answer.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

My preferred method is to place a backing block of crummy wood behind the hole location, drill all the way through from the good side.
--
Saville

Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
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On Thu, 26 May 2005 10:18:33 -0400, "Virgil Smith"
suck it up.

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1) Cordless phone and battery operated lamp.
2) Fish lines through the wall and put new outlets above desktop.
3) Keep hole small by removing cord from lamp and feeding through, or cutting off plug, feeding through, then install new plug below desk. Could do the same with phone plug, but it is pretty small anyway.
4) A shop-made item similar to the grommets others have mentioned. I would do a square hole (at the back edge, since my square drill bits are out for sharpening<g>) large enough to pass any electrical plugs. I'd glue support strips under the edges of the hole to create a ledge for my plug to rest on, and cut a tightly fitting plug of the same wood as my desktop, matching grain as closely as I could. I'd drill a 1/4 circle off a corner, as small as possible to still pass the cords.
I like #2 or #4, since you will be able to change lamps, add new plug-in items, etc.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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wrote:

Install a power strip (the ones with a phone jack) to the underside of the knee hole.
MikeG
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My suggestion, as most of the harware shown allows for the PLUG and wire to come through the desk surface I would cut the plugs off and make the hole size just large enough for the wire only. A 1/4" hole is all that is necessary in most cases .which in most cases can be plugged with a standard [plug at a later date . After installation the particular items can ne replugged . As far as I am concerned the gommet thing is only reserved for things like computer equipment that have specialty plugs.
Perhaps another solution along the same lines as the desk top no doubt has an edge molding ,how about making cuts through the molding just deep enough to accomodate the wiring adjacent to the particular item on the desktop.....mjh
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Do you have enough room to using thin furring strips on the back or on the wall, to leave room for the cables to hang off the back?
mac
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YES! This is a better solution. On built in desks I've often used a detail where there is a continuous slot along tha back. Basicially stand the desk a few inches out away from the wall. In some cases we add an edge band that stands up a 1/4" or so to keep pencils from rolling off the back.
Just put some blocks at the back, on the wall or on the desk, to keep it away from the wall.
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Think upside down. Dangle cords from above and hide with either a chartreuse or peach coloured tapestry. After that, make some muffins.
Pretty graceful, eh?
<G>
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wrote:

to
inch
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wrote:

to
inch
And for heavens sake do not put the hot muffin tray on the bloody desktop......mjh
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I sort of favor mauve draped gracefully, and scones.. *g*
mac
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The grommet is the most common way. I also like the idea of keeping the desk an inch or so off the wall. There is also a grommet made for this gap, to keep stuff from falling behind. Check out.
http://cableorganizer.com/images/computer-cabinets/brush-grommet.jpg < Not really what I was thinking of but could be a good solution.
Here is the grommet incorporated into design. Pretty nice. http://rencodesign.com/html/det_exret3.html
Hmm - I couldn't find exactly what I was looking for. It came with a desk I bought from Lizel's in Lansdale, PA. It is sort of like a door sweep. Made of rubber. It connects to the top edge of the vertical piece at the back of the desk. It compresses against the bottom of the top. It is used to keep cables from getting lost and holding them in place. Its not visible from top but requires the desk to be a bit away from wall.
Good luck - Let us know what you do
-B

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Here's another thought - if the desk sits against drywall, cut out a small piece, say 2 x 12 inches so that most of it is below the desk. Then, make a small box to fit into the drywall with a "shelf" through which a (say) 1 inch hole is drilled.
Bring the wires into the "box" from underneath and through the hole out onto the desk surface. Of course, you could trim it out to make it match the desk.
I have never tried it, but it might work if you really don't want any desk holes.
FWIW.
Lou

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On Thu, 26 May 2005 10:18:33 -0400, "Virgil Smith"

The holes don't bother me since I usually have something sitting in front of them anyway. If you just can't stand drilling through the top you can always cut some holes in the drywall and use re-mod boxes. You will have to fish the wires through but assuming the current boxes are under the desk it shouldn't be much of a problem.
Mike O.
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