Bridge Table Designs

It seems that Bridge is making a return. We have had several requests for Bridge tables and have decided to offer a few styles. The Goggle Images search was not as helpful as I had hoped. Any ideas or leads would be appreciated. Thanks, JG
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I'm a bridge fiend, myself.
A card table is a card table.
Specifications: 36" square, 30" high.
flat surface, relatively smooth, but _not_ 'slick'. "classical" high- end card tables have a leather surface.
*stable*
Generally, these are tables that you bring out of storage "on demand", so folding legs are typical, as is a 'carrying handle' on the bottom side. Relatively light weight is also a significant 'feature'.
Because of the folding nature, legs are almost always at the outside corners of the top. 'pedestal' type bases just tend to get in the way.
There is _very_little_ flexibility in the table dimension. 34" is 'crowded", 39" is verging on 'too big' -- cards on the far side of the table have to be within 'arms reach' of the player on the near side of the table.
During play, the entire table-top is pretty much committed. There _isn't_ any good place for drinks or snacks. Optional "outriggers" that lever off the table-legs and provide either glass holders, or flat surface space (for snacks, ashtrays, etc.) are a nice "plus".
A torsion box design, w/ the upper surface of 1/8" tempered "Masonite"(tm) is probably appropriate. "Veneer" it with vinyl, leather, or wood, to suit.
Years ago, I made some 'replacement' tops for some *cheap* commercially-sold card-tables. 1/2" x 1-1/2" stock for a perimeter frame (the 1-1/2" was the vertical dimension), a rabbet on the inside of the perimeter frame, to accept a 1/8" tempered Masonite square. 1/4" round-over on the tabletop perimeter, and left the vertical corners square. Add 2 1/2"x1/2" stringers (one 12" from each edge) in each direction, to stabilize the top. screws through the rivet-holes (that held the original top on) in the tubular metal frame. Add a couple of coats of gloss varnish, and a finish coat of _flat_, and Voila! Construction time about 1/2 hr. and about 1 hr on applying the finish. Elapsed time, most of a week -- let the glue-up sit overnight (two stages -- first day the frame, second day, the Masonite into the assembled frame), and overnight between varnish coats. Tops were approx 37-1/2" square, and stood 30-1/2" tall. Only one problem. they didn't fit worth a d*mn in a 36" deep closet. <wry grin>
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I've seen a folding design where the top is cut in half, and folds over on itself. The base is mounted to a sliding dovetail arrangement, and when the top is closed, it slides forward so the whole thing is half-sized, and when the top is open, it slides back, toward the center of the now-expanded top to provide support.
The one my mother has in her front hallway is decorated in a Federal style, has a drawer in the base to hold the cards, scoring pads, etc, and can be set against the wall with half the top vertical, which is how she keeps it most of the time. Nice piece. I've got dibs on that one, right, Mom?
Henry Bibb
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Robert B. Wrote a good description which is not showing up on my rec. w but showed up on Goggle when I used JOATs suggestion to look for knock down table. JG
JGS wrote:

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