Breaker and wire size?

Hi, I think I've finally decided on my new table saw, the Grizzly model 1023S, 3hp cabinet saw. Should I go with a 20 or a 30 amp breaker? And, should I go with 10 guage or 12 guage wire?
TIA,
Tony
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I'm not an electrician... but I would (and did):
20 amp breaker 12 gauge wire (opt for the 10 if you want, but not needed).
-jbd

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20 amp should be fine on a 3hp motor
Frankly, I prefer to go with the heavier wire unless forced into the samller. I would use 10ga in my shop/wiring for this
John
wrote:

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"Tony" wrote in message

I ran 10 ga/20A circuit to my table saw. While 12 ga would have been sufficient, when you're pulling wire you might as well go one up in case you want to upgrade in the future ... it is usually easier, and cheaper, to do it now instead of later.
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Is this a 2 wire (black, white & copper ground), or 3 wire (black, white, red & copper ground)?

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"KRead" wrote in message

Two conductor w/g.
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220v

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None of the above. A 220V 20A circuit can be wired with a blue wire, brown wire and green wire.
The only code color requirements are for the grounding and grounded connections.
(grounding green, or grey with green stripe) (grounded white (or under certain circumstances white stripe or other white marking - not applicable to residential wiring generally)).
scott
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I think Scott is referring to type NM (Romex) cable. You can us the two wire (Black and White) with a bare or Green ground wire for strictly 220V circuits. It may be run in metal or plastic conduit. Metal conduit must be grounded with an accepted method. However it is necessary to reidentify the White wire with colored (Other than White, Green or Gray) tape at ALL terminations.
Appliance current, in AMPeres will determine the wire size and current protection. Continuos load can not exceed 80 % of wire capacity. For all 110/220V circuits 3 insulated wires (Two colored and one White or Gray) along with a ground wire is required.
BOY, Brown, Orange and Yellow with a Gray or White neutral is being recognized for 120/277V 3 phase circuits, But not mandatory. Green, White or White striped and Gray are still the only designated purpose colored wires for wiring.
Hope this helps.
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Chipper Wood

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Actually, while the above is correct, I was referring specifically to the identification of grounded conductors in traditionally industrial/commercial settings where 000/0000/750MCM may be run using black AL cable for the grounded conductor and is then marked appropriately at each termination point. Often occurs on service drops as well.
scott

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Sorry Scott,
I only read the posting included in my post. White is universally recognized as a neutral, Green or bare as a ground. So one would not do wrong in using those colors. Unless there is a need to universally identify phase, running 2 or 3 black wires as ungrounded conductors is acceptable. Sounds like you are involved in a large project. (750s) Power companies have the option to use one bare derated neutral/ground for services.
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I ran a 20 Amp breaker / 12 guage wire for my Delta 3 HP. In theory it should have been more than sufficient....but about every 25th time I turn it on, the breaker pops. I'm moving to a new house next month and you can be sure that I'll be running 10 guage wire on a 30 amp breaker.
Hope this helps!

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Same thing happens with my 3Hp saw on 220V 20A breaker. Maybe not as often as every 25th time, but it does happen. I called the manufacturer and he said that the motor can pull over 30A momentarily at startup. I have no plans to change the breaker, eventhough it is 10 ga wire. Ken
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Hey guys
3Hp = 3 Hp * 745.7 Watt/ Hp = 2237.1 Watt = 2240 watt rounded
Amp = 2240 watt / 110 volt = 2240 amp/volt / 110 volt = 20.37 Amp
on a 220 Circuit Amp = 2240 watt / 220 volt = 10.18 amp
So i vote 30 Amp breaker and 10 gauge wiring. If you are on 110 volt line. 20 Amp breaker and 12 gauge line on a 220volt line.
Hope this Help. Sofjan Mustopoh
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