Breadboard Ends

What would be the proper size for a breadboard end on a 24x48 in table top? I'm figuring on 2 inches.
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On 8 Aug 2004 18:24:18 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (cutsquare) wrote:

Let's assume that your breadboards are going on the 24" dimension. The more interesting questions revolve around the wood species, the moisture content, the cut of the boards, etc.
I like making breadboards with a sliding dovetail that is pinned at one end. I calculate the shrinkage and expansion based on the considerations listed above.
I like to select the boards that make up the top so that they are cut to provide the least expansion and contraction across their width.
I make the breadboard the length of the maximum calculated expansion, given the expected shifts in moisture content of the space that the piece is to live in.
The width of the breadboard is mostly a design issue that is based on what looks the best to your eye.
I prefer making the breadboard somewhat thicker than that of the table.
ymmv
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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I made a pine TV utility stand years ago with 1.5" breadboard ends. Only during the winter months, the breadboard ends stand proud. They are fastened only in the middle. If they were fastened only in the front, there would be no noticeable differences, although a much larger difference in the back.
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