Brazing cast iron

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OK so I'm convinced that using JB weld won't hold up so I'll try brazing this cracked plane I have.
MAPP gas What tip? Can I just use the same tip I use with propane to sweat copper pipe?
What kind of 'brazing' rods? I was surprised that HF didn't carry them
these? (Amazon.com product link shortened)98923442&sr=8-8
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)98923442&sr=8-8
LA:
My recollection isn't bring up the name of the rod but I used a different gas source.
One thing that helped at the time was following professional advice that getting the cast iron body hot before brazing was wise. You may try a little spell in the oven first to accomplish that. Someone on RCM would know on the rod.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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On 2/28/2011 2:11 PM, Limp Arbor wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)98923442&sr=8-8
Hey, I am not a welder, but I was a pipefitter and I worked with welders on a daily basis. I have been involved in a few cast iron repairs and Mapp gas is not the answer. You want an oxy-acetylene torch with a brazing tip. And like the other poster said, you want the cast to be hot (the oven thing won't do it). Use the torch to heat it up. A plane is not that big and will heat up nicely with a torch.
Take a look at this site:
http://www.weldguru.com/braze-cast-iron.html
More info than you will ever need and what kind of rods to use.
Good luck!
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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"Robert Allison" wrote:

----------------------------------- Let's see,
Friday is payday. Crap doesn't flow up hill, Never bite your finger nails,
and last but not least,
Never eat the yellow snow.
Devil made me do it with cudos to Flip.
<G>
Lew
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On 2/28/2011 11:20 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Lew, you know how to tell the difference between a pipefitter and a plumber?
Stand them both up to their chests in a septic tank and swing a 2x4 at their heads. The pipefitter will put up his hands and the plumber will duck.
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
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Good link - I have a project where that info will come in handy. Thanks for posting it.
R
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On Mon, 28 Feb 2011 12:11:33 -0800 (PST), Limp Arbor

Rots a Ruck brazing cast iron with a MAPP torch.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I was thinking MAPP gas & Oxygen. That would most assuredly do it, right?
Bill
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I've used straight MAPP to silver solder (50/50 silver/copper jeweler's solder) lugs onto bike frames, so it *should* work on cast iron. Trick is to place a heat-reflecting surface behind the work to get the most from the torch. Firebrick or a tray of pea gravel works well. Silver/copper solder is plenty strong, it's what's used to hold carbide chips on saw blades and router bits.
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I made an aluminum bike frame a long time ago - milled the tubes and had someone weld it up. Rode the bike across the country back in the 80's. I've always wanted to make a lugged steel frame. What sort of bike did you make, and where did you get the tubes and lugs?
R
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Cheap Ross 10 speed, seeing if I could pretty it up. Bought the parts -- cable and bottle bosses, not lugs (apologies) from a local frame builder. Worked fine, didn't seem to hurt the frame.
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On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 00:06:07 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Why, because of the quick heatsinking of the stuff? I've seen several nicely brazed plane repairs, so I know it's doable. And MAPP will easily get a small cracked section of a plane to red-hot temps. I don't see the big deal, clare. Heatsinking might be a problem on a thick tablesaur top, though. I think a second MAPP torch would fix that if push came to shove.
From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAPP_gas "MAPP gas is also used in combustion with air for brazing and soldering, where it has considerable advantages over competing propane fuel due to its high combustion temperature of 2,020°C (3,670°F)."
-- That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way. -- Doris Lessing
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On Tue, 01 Mar 2011 06:51:16 -0800, Larry Jaques

With a mapp/oxy torch it would be do-able, but I've attempted brazing with my turbo-torch on MAPP with much less than successful results. I just haul out the oxy-acetylene for most brazing jobs - and for finer stuff, haul it out to the hanger to the TIG torch.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

>>>(Amazon.com product link shortened)98923442&sr=8-8
Note that MAPP no longer exists in the market. The patent holder went under and the patent has another 10 years or so to run before somebody else can start making it. I believe the replacement is propylene, which supposedly burns about 50 degrees cooler.
If you're looking for a MAPP torch and can't find one that's the reason.
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2011 00:45:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

OK, but what size object were you brazing on?
Planes such as the #10 usually crack in the cheek, so heatsinking is minimal. Have you tried a cheek repair with the turbo mapp?
-- That is what learning is. You suddenly understand something you've understood all your life, but in a new way. -- Doris Lessing
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Limp Arbor wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)98923442&sr=8-8
Tobin bronze and flux with oxy acetylene
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It's not worth the time and effort. There's a strong possibility that the heat from the brazing will distort the body and it will be a nightmare to get the plane to work properly. Salvage whatever parts you can and toss the rest.
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In article <41dad7ea-5fb4-4b41-ae65-

If he's never brazed anything before and likes to try new stuff then brazing the plane is worthwile as an exercise--if it ends up unrepairable he's no worse off and has learned a new skill. If it ends up usable then he's ahead of the game.
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On 3/1/2011 9:30 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Yep. Cheap tuition!
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A hotter torch lets you work faster, thus reduces warpage.
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