Brazilian Rosewood

Page 1 of 2  
Hello
I am starting a new project soon. the plans call for Brazilian Rosewood . the problem is none is available. so I would like some possible recommendation for a similar type of wood . the project involves wooden gears. so stability is important. any suggestion will be greatly appreciated
Gord
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bolivian rosewood

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Teak? Padouk is also supposed to be very stable (but looks nothing like rosewood). There are a bunch of other rosewoods (genus Dalbergia), such as Honduran rosewood and Bolivian rosewood. Indian Rosewood is alleged to be more stable than Brazilian. If you want something really dense you could try African Blackwood which is heavier than water (it's a Dalbergia too). I think these last two may be available only as turning blanks so your project would have to be small.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
--

"Gordon Menzies" < snipped-for-privacy@shaw.caNOSPAM> wrote in message
news:PsO2d.456629$gE.322467@pd7tw3no...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

well it is at about 100.00 a bf (G) cocobolo or Indian rosewood would be fine. ipe would work too.
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where do you live? Not too far from here I can buy all the "rosewood" (no specifics given by supplier) I can carry for $10/BF.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lyptus. Cheaper than walnut or cherry. Very heavy. Machines well. Environmentaly kinder since it's grown on farms.
http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/ourbusinesses/buildingproducts/buildingmaterials/ourproducts/lyptus /
http://www.specialtyforest.com/product/lumber/lyptus.htm
Looks good finished, too.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Never Enough Money) wrote in

But lyptus isn't anything like rosewood. A design change is in order, somehow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you need a rosewood, try cocobolo or Honduran rosewood. If you want to substitute for a cheaper wood, try jatoba (brazilian cherry) or even use a good dark piece of walnut or cherry.
Gary in KC

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I really like dalbergia stevensonii (Honduran Rosewood) and dalbergia retusa (cocobolo). The cocobolo has a greater tendency to split and can be hard to find dry. It also has a much greater variety of color and generally a wilder appearance. They are both fantastic to work; choose based on appearance. All the "Honduran" Rosewood I've bought actually came from Belize.
I don't think Bolivian Rosewood is a dalbergia -- not that that really matters -- but it could be another option for you. I've never used it.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have nothing against rosewood but I have had good luck using purpleheart in situations where durability was required. I made a couple gate latches of purpleheart about 15 years ago and they are still going strong. Both the latch and the strike plate are purpleheart.
Dick

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jim do you know about greenheart and how it compares with cocobolo for splitting? (I don't know, I want to know which one splits less)
Thanks, Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

once cocobolo is fully dry it is pretty stable. but the pretty dry part is hard to tell. only 3 or 4% too much moisture can cause it to check.
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Knight wrote...

Steve, I'm glad you posted this. I had written "split" when I meant "check."
Properly dried, cocobolo has pretty good split resistance. Please excuse the poor choice of words on my part.
Cheers!
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(G) no problem. the wood can drive me nuts. I had a batch of 4/4 that read fine and a few pieces a bit drier then normal. I built the planes shipped them off to Iraq and one of them came apart a little bit. now all cocobolo goes in the vacuum kiln just to make sure.
--
Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes
Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Steve what is the exact meaning of the word 'check' for wood? Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wood Handbook: "CHECK. A lengthwise separation of the wood ... commonly results from stresses set up in wood during seasoning."
Basically a check is small relative to the piece of wood. PvR
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AArDvarK wrote...

Greenheart is another name that is used for more than one species. Check to be sure what you're getting. I have even heard ipe called greenheart. Anyway, the main species I think is ocotea rodiaei. I have never worked with it, so I can't compare it to cocobolo, but the specs on the FPL website are impressive. Looks like it would make great outdoor furniture, among other things.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks Jim, I am curious because it is the other choice, other than cocobolo, for chisel handles from Harris tools, and those are sockets. Costa Rica.
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

****** Yes, that is pretty normal. In Costa Rica "greenheart" will be what is called "ip" in Brazil ******

****** Yes, but only one species {not "main"]. These days it is called Chlorocardium rodiei [Chloros = green, cardia = heart; after Rodie, MD] There is a second species in Chlorocardium, but it won't be traded
****** I have never worked

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.