Brads, finish nails, and staples - advice

Can anyone suggest where I would use one type of fastener in place of another? I've just acquired a pneumatic nailer and stapler and am confused by all of the choices I now have.
Also are there recommended lengths? Obviously the fastener needs to protrude past the first component but how deep into the other should I be aiming to achieve?
Thanks,
Bill
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Bill Wichser wrote:

I'd imagine this info applies to brads as well as it does to screws: Totals fastener length = 3X thickness of thinner material.
http://www.mcfeelys.com/length.asp
Short answer, as deep as possible, unless you are intending them to come apart.
For example, when nailing a 3/4 to a 3/4, I use the "Add them together and subtract a bit" rule: 3/4 + 3/4 - 1/8 = 1 3/8. However, when is 3/4 really 3/4 (if store bought)? And, when is your brad nailer not going to counter sink a bit? Use 1 1/4" :)
Jay
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snipped-for-privacy@kreusch.com says...

depth/length of nail the more likely I have one or two longer nails left in the gun from last time that I didn't see before I loaded in the "correct" length nails this time.
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The stapler is used for fastenening thin to thick, such as 1/4 or 1/8 backs to cabinets. Nailers are used for pretty much anything Norm builds.
David
Bill Wichser wrote:

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Bill wrote:>Can anyone suggest where I would use one type of fastener in place of

as backsides 'n such. There ya go. Tom Work at your leisure!
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Thanks to all who responded. I think I have it now and can comfortably proceed with the little bit of knowledge I now have.
To summarize:
Brads are for tacking "while the glue sets up" as well as for small mouldings.
Finish nails are for the bigger "stuff" like crown moulding and window casings where they provide some structural support.
Staples are for thin material like cabinet backs.
As for length, it is best to go as deep as possible but not less than half an inch.
Once again this forum has provided information which is timely and invaluable.
Bill
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Brads are used when you want to hold something together while the glue dries or for attaching lighter weight mouldings. Brad nails are available up to 2" in length. Finish nails are heavier guage, and of course leave a larger hole, and come in lengths up to 2.5". These are useful for heavier crown moulding, door and window casings, etc. Brad nails are 18ga, and finish nails are 15 or 16 ga. The thicker shank in finish nails is less likely to be deflected by the grain direction in hardwoods.
Crown staples have good holding power and are usefull for thin materials or materials that are soft or tear easy, where brad nails can easily pull through, such as mdf, and masonite or luan commonly used for cabinet backs. 1/4" crown staples are readily available in sizes up to 1.5" or so.
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mp wrote:

Good description...minor nit--finish nails come in standard sizes up to 16d
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Yes, but the OP was referring to supplies for air nailers.
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mp wrote:

Ahhhh...I missed that.
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