Brad-point vs. Forstner vs. Spade bits

I see sets of each type that cover roughly the same dimensions (1/8" to 1"). I know Forstners are for truly flat-bottomed holes, and brad-points don't walk compared to regular twist drill bits ... aside from that, are advantages of one type over another?
If you could have a set of only 1 type for woodworking, which would you have? If you could have 2 sets, which would you drop? Are there any specific sizes that are must-have for woodworking?
Thanks, Michael
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First get yourself a good set of brad point bits going up to 1/2". That will handle the majority of your drilling work. Then buy yourself a good set of forstner bits for the larger size holes. I've got the spade bits also, but rarely use them. Spade bits are for more rough work than I usually do.
Gary

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Twist would be the least-expensive, most utilitarian.

Brad points.

Keep Brad and Forstner, drop twist.

I think this is one time where a "set" is pretty useful. I'd go for 1/8" to 1/2" by 1/32nds for a start. See either Lee Valley or Bits N Bores.com
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wrote:
People who favor brad points
I like them very much too, but how the heck can you resharpen those?!
All the fancy drill re sharpeners I've seen are for twist drills only-
James snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com
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I use an auger bit file.
http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/product.asp?0=0&1=0&3%97
Just don't let 'em get too dull, and it only takes a minute or so.
Henry Bibb
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brought forth from the murky depths:

With auger files or tapered diamond files. Lee Valley has a sweet little auger bit file: 62W08.01 $8.50USD
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I wouldn't have spade bits; I prefer carbide brad bits foor almost all work but will use a Forstners when I have to. Forstners takes a drill press so is kind of a bother. Try using a Forstners in a hand drill and you will have an interesting time.
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:57:07 -0500, Michael Press

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On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 10:25:11 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

I use forstners in a hand drill all of the time. the only place I could see having problems is when you need to make a cut with a significant part of the rim not contacting- an angled hole (pocket hole style) or where the bit is hanging over the edge quite a ways.
if I need better accuracy than I can count on by hand I'll use the drill press or a drill guide if the workpiece is too big for the press.
as far as the OP's question, the different kinds of bits are for different purposes. there is some overlap of function, but generally you should get the ones you need first, first. of the ones you listed, the forstners are the most expensive, so will likely be the last purchased, depending on your work.
bridger

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Wondered about that myself which is why I bought carbide. Bought them from HF 8 years ago and they were a good investment.
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 10:25:11 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

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I've used a 7/8" Freud carbid tipped Forstner in a Dewalt 3/8" drill and it worked without any difficulty whatsoever.
Bob
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