Brad nailer and tire inflator tank, dangerous?

This pneumatics brad nailer calls for 55-100-psi, the 5G tank supplies 120-psi. The instructions on the side of the tank says, "do not use on pneumatics tools." It didn't say anything about single shot nailers. The laws of physics yet is prove itself. But if anyone see an imminent tank explosion from a hundreds brads let me know so I can get a proper pancake tank. What is the danger with running brad nailers off tire inflator tank?
Thanks
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Leroy Mowry wrote:

Since when is a brad nailer not a pneumatic tool ? You're going to cause excessive wear on the moving parts of the nailer . I've seen nailers with the bottom of the cylinder broken out from excessive pressure . The drive pin can break . The piston o-rings can fail . And last but not least , the casting can rupture - especially if it's one of the cheap imports . Why not make a trip to the nearest hardware store and pick up a cheap regulator and a couple of quick disconnects ?
--
Snag aka OSG #1
'76 FLH "Bag Lady"
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One thought would be to put a pressure regulator on the outlet side fitting of the tank and dial in about 85-90 psig for the nailer.
However, I would call the maker of the tank and ask them WHY they state the limitation/prohibition that they do
John
On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 05:43:41 -0600, "Terry Coombs"

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Or until then, simply fill the tank to only 100psi?
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Without a regulator, there's nothing to insure a given level of pressure to your tool. You won't be able to sink nails to a given depth with any consistency, because the air pressure supplied to your tool will diminish somewhat with each nail. Also, your tools will have a range of acceptable pressure. My compressor's tank may have 120 psi, but the output to my impact wrench is consistent at 90 psi. Your tank's not going to explode, but a Harbor Freight nailer might. Make sure the pressure in the tank doesn't exceed the pressure level acceptable by your tools! The "right" solution is a compressor. Your setup is one I'd consider for emergency use, where the only option you have is to take air with you.
Dave

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Just a guess but I'd think it applies to high cfm tools. In my youth I once fried the motor in a small compressor by using it to run a pressure washing tool. Compressor was running pretty much constantly trying to keep up.
Steve.
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Oops. Wasn't awake and missed the last line. Just put a regulator on it.
Steve.
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once
washing
How can he run a tire inflator tank constantly? It's just a storage tank.
Brian
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I do it all the time. I don't see what the problem could be.
Barry
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 14:49:54 GMT, Ba r r y

Check that, I was assuming that you were using a regulator, as I do.
No regulator could be a problem. Most BORGs sell small regulators for less than $20. I actually use a second regulator near the tool about 90% of the time, as it saves trips back to the compressor for fine pressure adjustments.
Barry
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I have been using one for yeaqrs now with no problem .recently my compressor quit so I go to the local gas station and recharge it .It will operate my brad nailer for half a day before needing to be recharged ...mjh
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Your not going to be able to do much nailing before the air in the tank has gone down too low.
Ted
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A brad nailer doesn't use very much air. I have a "proper" hotdog air compresor for mine, and I can use up nearly a full load of brads before it will trip the low pressure switch on the compressor. A framing nailer is a different story. Only get about a dozen nails before it cycles.
Depending on the size of his tank, the OP could do a reasonable amount of work before needing to refill his tank. In any case, a regulator is still highly recommended. For safety issues, and so one has a consistent driving force.
JW
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