Brad Nail Holes What's Best Way to Fill Them?

Page 2 of 2  
Alan Smithee wrote:

Ask Norm. He has more experience than anyone I know. The other day there was a close-up shot of Brad-O-Matic and it clearly showed that his brads are slightly countersunk. This means he MUST be leaving them in after the glue sets otherwise he's have to make craters to get them out. And this was on an exterior piece of gingerbread (fancy trim) too!
FoggyTown
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, I see at least 3 reasonable approaches here, and I'll add another. In one case I stained and finished all the pieces before assembly. For the nail holes I made filler using sawdust and glue, adding enough stain so it matched when dry. Test this first, as the dust will take the stain differently. For each hole, stuck some in and immediately wiped with a damp sponge. The finish prevented either the stain or the glue from sticking at all, and it easily wiped clean. Did several hundred nail holes this way.
After it dries, check with a raking light. You may find a few holes that aren't completely filled, and do a second pass.
One variation where you have a gloss finish is to apply only enough finish to seal, then the final finish coats after the holes are filled, so the filled holes have the same gloss.
Note: If you should end up staining after nailing, often a dark stain will cause the hole to be outlined because of the grain difference. Even nailing through tape may not prevent this, so try it first. Just don't ask me how I learned it.
GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GerryG wrote:

Thank you. It sounds like you know what you're talking about. I'm going to start by testing your method. I've no shortage of sawdust.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Your welcome, and here's a follow-up-- Somewhere inside the cabinet, either write on the wood or place a label identifying your finishing schedule, including exact stain and finish. Five years from now you'll be glad you did this. ...and... with any furniture I make for people, I include a small touch-up bottle. Offen a toner made from a little stain and finish. With a thin brush they can hide small scratches that penetrate to bare wood. GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I might use brad nails for some painted furniture projects, and in that case I follow the advice of the brad Godfather Norm and use 33 glazing compound.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.