Brace drilling bench bolt holes


I am going to drill bench bolt holes into the stretchers and side braces using a hand brace hopefully through a self centering doweling jig, maybe 8" total depth to meet the nut holes, for the stretchers and shorter for the side braces. Straight through the tenons but that length must include to the outside of the leg, thickness from a "blind mortise".
I noticed, because of the single wide flute of the bit (old Greenlee), it wobbles widely in the SCDJ, so I don't think it would work to keep it straight.
Was there ever a DJ made for these types of bits? Any specific maker and model#?
Or should I buy a long brad point bit and use my skildrill?
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Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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The dowel jig is meant to align holes that will be about one inch in depth. 8 inches is another story. Spade type bits are famous for going around corners; very difficult to drill a straight 8 inch hole with one of these. Better off with an auger type bitt. Or.....is it too late to make these holes using the drill press. Dave
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but not all finished... some still need to be cut down to length. I get the impression that auger bits tend to wander off the straight line while in use.
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Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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The cheapest alternative is to buy an auger bit for your brace (about $10 in my area). Drill a small pilot hole (1/8") about 2-3" deep using whatever means you have to make it straight. Then follow with the brace and bit. The pilot hole will cause the brace to follow a straight path.
Bob
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that going into a pilot hole with nothing to twist into so it is drawn in properly?
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Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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AAvK wrote:

you can drill a nice clean straight hole with just a bit and brace. the dowell jig will just get in the way.
first, make sure the bit is in good shape. get it clean and sharp, and make sure it is straight. start a hole with it in a chunk of scrap wood. when the spur just completes scoring the circle, stop and carefully measure that circle. if it's undersize from wear on the outside of the spur you'll have a hard time controlling the bit.
now carefully lay out your hole, both the entrance and exit of it. draw lines on the workpiece thet intersect at the center of the hole. make a line parallel to the edge of the bench and one perpendicular to it.
now get a buddy with good eyes and steady nerves. as you drill, have your helper sight the bit against the lines. if you have a surface you can set a framing square to to compare that against the bit, all the better. go slow, checking frequently, especially at first. once the bit is buried an inch or two into the wood you won't be able to steer it much, so get it straight to start with. make a few practise holes to get your signals straight.
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Did that, I made the hole about 1/16" deep. Upon the two crosswise measurments, the caliper reads 0.521" width. Old Greenlee steel is damn nice, already have this bit very sharp, Lee's book, filing then soft and hard Arkansas mini stones.

THANKS! (After two weeks!) I will save your text and do it all when the time comes. Great to finally get some help. Much appreciated.
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Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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