Boxes a la Tom Watson

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On Mon, 7 Jun 2004 19:11:18 -0400, "Mike G"

It wasn't the ability to do curved moldings that sold me on the W+H, although I did buy the elliptical jig and used it quite often (and quite profitably - as the money that local millwork shops charge to do curved and elliptical casing is abominable).
The main selling points of the W+H over the others were the reduced setup time, owing to the design of the block that the knives mount on - which made changing profiles and aligning the cutters much faster and more accurate than on the competing machines, and the solidity of the cast iron W+H v. the sheet metal of the others.
I'd had a friend buy one of the sheet metal housed versions and it just didn't run as solid and smooth as the W+H. The chatter marks were more pronounced. The W+H could turn out a profile that needed very little tuning.
When you get interested in making the decision, ping me, and I'll send you copies of the invoices on the machine.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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Thank you Tom I'll keep that in mind.
Take care Mike
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Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Mike G wrote:

At a local estate sale I found an older 50's or so Woodmaste, I recall a model number like "400" or "408". The friend of the heir who was selling the stuff for her for $350 with one profile. There were some other knives for another $100 but none looked like anything I could use. The manual said there was also a drum sander and jointer accessory but I already have both so that was not worth anything to me.
If you're interested I could see if it's still available, get some digital shots of it and the knives and you can see if it's of use. If so, I can put you in touch with the seller. This was a few months ago so it might not still be available but ....
charlie b
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Thanks Charlie but I'd never squeeze on into the present shop. The W & H yes but not one of the Woodmaster
The whole expansion things is one of those, somewhere down the road. Right now I've got all the work the shop can handle but not enough to justify the "down the road".
Now a couple of days ago the little news blurbs on the yahoo page I use as a home page said something about some actress, Lopez I think, was going to have twins so I'm patiently waiting for the order to come through.
;-) Mike
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Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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I store mine under the stand which holds my Rockwell planer. And it's a 7" capacity, 14 if you reverse.
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George notes:

There you go. Memory is the second thing to go. Knees the first. And I only had the loan of a W&H for a couple, three months some years ago, so for some reason 9" hung in my mind.
Charlie Self "The test and the use of man's education is that he finds pleasure in the exercise of his mind." Jacques Barzun
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On 6 Jun 2004 18:01:51 -0700, n snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Nate Perkins) calmly ranted:

You might want to DAGS for "table saw cove cutting" for a less pricy way to do those boxes.
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Thanks, Larry. Will give it a try. I have cut some simpler edge coves using the table saw method, but haven't yet done a fully buried asymmetrical one. Guess it's time to learn. Tom's boxes are a great inspiration.
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Nate -
Doubt Tom uses this method - but I would cut the wavy sides and tops using
a bandsaw with lots of resaw capacity and a 1/4" blade. Followed with lots
of sanding.
Cheers! ref

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On 6 Jun 2004 08:23:01 -0700, n snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Nate Perkins) wrote:

Those boxes were made out of crown molding that was simply ripped at the appropriate places to make the sides. The top was made by ripping crown molding and gluing it back together to form the re curved top.
The cool thing about them is that they look far more complex than they really are.
I happened to make that crown on a W+H Molder but you could certainly do the same thing by starting with some stock molding.
It's interesting to look at a molding profile book, such as the one from Old World Moldings, and imagine what sort of shapes you could saw and re glue them into.
I gave a few away and someone saw one of them and ordered twenty of them to be built as business Christmas gifts (at fifty bucks each - about a thousand bucks for twenty hours work and some cherry that was "too interesting" to go into my usual casegoods projects).
After the run of twenty I decided that was enough.
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Thanks, Tom! Kudos on the great boxes and on the terrific web site.
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