Box joints for speaker cabinets help needed

Hi all, I'd like to know the most efficient way to make fairly large box joints for speaker cabinets without spending too much time doing it or a lot of money on tools. I do own a router (well two actually) that I usually use for finer work and edges but with all the templates I've seen, there's chisel work needed to square up the joints afterwards. Is there an easy way to set up a template that can handle this task so that I can use box joints for the sides (and back maybe) of the cabinet? The pieces have edges up to 80 cm (32 inches) and are typically between 1/2" and 3/4" thick birch ply. I wouldn't mind using dovetails instead if it's any easier. Thanks. cb
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Dovetails would be easier, only because there are fewer, but why are you even considering making speaker cabinets out of solid wood, when the acoustic nod goes to particle material?
Box joints can be done on a router, though pieces as large as you mention would require some handling equipment. It's not rocket science, just a fence the size of the bit, spaced a bit's width (or a RCH less) from the cutter. Each cut is referenced to the preceding, just as with tablesaw jigs, but I have to believe moving a router through a clamped board beats holding that same large board on a saw. No chisel necessary for any method I'm aware of.
Personally, I'd use a rabbet/tenon joint on particleboard, then veneer. Note that veneer does not have to be 1/20th of an inch thick. It could even be what you resaw and smooth.

for
and
that
1/2"
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Hi George,
How universal is the RCH measurement system? I haven't heard that one on a while.
Chris
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2003 00:33:23 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@filc8533.fm.intel.com (Chris Richmond - MD6-FDC ~) pixelated:

Most post-puberty hairs are usually the same size. It's universal, though sometimes illegal to gather for testing purposes depending upon the donor. Or so I've heard. ;)
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Ply is what's used for Musical Instrument speakers because of MDF not behaving well with liquids and manhandling. I guess that using a template with 2-4 guides and a block or 2 to steady the template against the board and to hold it in place is going to be the easiest way. For best looks, these need to be around the same thickness as the material. cb
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2003 10:34:46 +0200, "Chris Berry"

Not to mention weight.
Barry
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Who said anything about "Musical Instrument speakers"?
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Who said they _weren't_ Musical Instrument Speakers?
The original poster stated "speaker cabinets", which could mean car speaker cabinets, home/audiophile cabinets, musical instrument cabinets, Sound Reinforcement cabinets, or any other type. The original poster didn't state what the intended purpose was, so somebody else stated fact about Musical Instrument Speakers using ply. MDF is commonly used in home and audiophile speaker cabinets. It depends upon the intended application.
: Who said anything about "Musical Instrument speakers"?
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: "Chris Berry" wrote in message :> Ply is what's used for Musical Instrument speakers because of MDF not :> behaving well with liquids and manhandling. :> I guess that using a template with 2-4 guides and a block or 2 to steady : the :> template against the board and to hold it in place is going to be the :> easiest way. :> For best looks, these need to be around the same thickness as the : material. :> cb :> :>
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Bite me.
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Sorry for that bit of confusion. The material to be used was stated and not a point I wanted to bring up for discussion. I've had enough discussions about what material for which speaker purpose to last a life-time. HOWEVER - now that it's been brought up - I'd like to ask if the material sold as "Betonplex" over here - essentially waterproofed ply with a non-slip surface is easy enough to glue or should I remove the surfacing if I take that route with a router? Thanks. cb
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It was more for strength. Marshall make some of the hardiest boxes with finger joints. cb
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FWIW, a good friend and fellow band member builds some of the best engineered (and most expensive) speakers in the world. They use a high quality, veneered MDF, and build the enclosures using glued rabbet joints. Panels, cutouts, and rabbets are done using a CNC router, but it's a lot easier to make a rabbet joint in your shop than to worry with finger joints or dovetails, particularly in your specified material.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 12:57:48 GMT, Swingman wrote:

Sorry, still somewhat of a newbie here, but what is a CNC router? I tried Googling and found some interesting pictures, but no real description. Looks like a machinists tool.
thanks david
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D K Woods wrote:

Computerized Numerical Control. Essentially, a plotter with a router motor in place of a pen.
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Chris, You can usually use a dovetail jig to make finger joints. I don't know if you would get much splintering on the plywood. Ted

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Thanks. Is there a partial dovetail jig that I can use on larger pieces or must I make my own? cb
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