Bosch Reaxx Table Saw

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On 9/16/2015 1:59 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Precicely
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On 9/16/2015 11:56 AM, dpb wrote:

Actually the brake slams into the blade and the force of the mass transfers to a trip lever. Some how I tripped the lever, while fiddling around down there and the arbor/brake/carriage assembly dropped to the lower section of the saw. DAMHIDT. ;~) But there is a possibility that something could interfere with the downward travel, though not very likely. The brake "shoe" pivots on a steel rod on that carriage assembly. The shoe under spring tension is held in place internally by a fusible link. The fusible link is holding that compressed spring that forces the shoe to pivot into the blade should the fusible link melt. And the brake is curved with approximately the same diameter as the blade. The brake "shoe" has to be adjusted to about 1/16 of actually touching the blade. I have to make that adjustment every time I switch from my older sharpened 10" blade to my unsharpened 8" dado set and visa versa.
So actually the SS brake begins to stop the blade before it drops the blade.
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On 9/16/15 8:43 AM, Leon wrote:

Using that logic, you would have to say they are both insufficient and shouldn't be trusted to save your fingers because they neither uses *three* lines of defense to prevent you from being cut during a trigger.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 9/16/2015 11:00 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

LOL. Yeah! But you have to start somewhere. Enter chain-mail into the mix.
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wrote:

That will just get caught and drag your extremities into the blade. (going further out on the it could happen scale) ;)
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On 9/16/2015 2:51 PM, Markem wrote:

OK add seat belts and air bags to keep you from being pulled in. LOL
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wrote:

Yes just like the rodeo cowboy in the OSHA cartoon.
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On 9/16/2015 9:43 AM, Leon wrote:

The big picture is.. you don't lose your finger. So either is cheap by comparison.
If you triggered it for REAL its saved you thousands and pain. If you triggered it falsely.. well then you are aggravated either way. But the Bosch would be cheaper. But again, it's a small saw.
--
Jeff

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On 9/16/2015 9:24 AM, dpb wrote:

I think the plate might actually require straightening after. I can't imagine that the forces would not cause any deformation while happening.
Looking at the carbide is one thing, having Forrest go over my plate was another.
--
Jeff

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On 9/16/2015 1:55 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I'm sure the blade would have to be reflattened. IIRC Forrest charges by time involved. So you are quickly coming up on just buying a new blade.
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On 09/16/2015 2:50 PM, Leon wrote: ...

IIRC, the quoted repair on the one in question was <2/3rds new...I don't know what just routine sharpening charge is but it's not uncommon to have to have a tooth tip replace anyway and they always retension/flatten so it's not like that's out of the ordinary. If it is beyond cost-effectiveness, they'll tell ya'...
--



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On 9/16/2015 3:04 PM, dpb wrote:

automatically re-flatten in that situation but not if they simply resharpen.
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On 9/16/2015 4:04 PM, dpb wrote:

I know mine was out of whack. The price was not that bad. I can't remember, and don't see it in my files on m laptop. I'll see if it's filed in my file cabinet when I get home.
But it was reasonable for a sharpening and straightening.
--
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On 9/16/2015 9:24 AM, dpb wrote: ...

I think the plate might actually require straightening after. I can't imagine that the forces would not cause any deformation while happening. ...
Well, yes, that's routine every time you send them one, whether it's been in a SS event or not...
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On 9/16/2015 1:59 PM, dpb wrote:

Reflattening might be routine for you but Forrest does not re-flatten or check flatness for that matter unless requested.
When I send my blades in to Forrest for resharpening I give specific instructions to return to factory specs instead of do this, do that, do what ever. I also tell them to call me if repairs and resharpening will exceed $50. I think I only had to pay extra to re-flatten one time after I tilted the bevel with the zero insert in place. Forrest does not assume anything, they want explicit instructions.
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On 9/16/2015 4:13 PM, Leon wrote:

That's good wording. I stopped by there one day. I explained the problem I was experiencing while cutting. He looked at my carbide, said it needed sharpening. Then he brought it over to one of the guys for a quick inspection. They work in dark rooms, I assume they are using an optical comparitor. He quickly checked and said it was warped.
That would explain the rough cuts.
Next blade I buy will be a full kerf rather than a thin kerf. But that's after I get my saw stop.
--
Jeff

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On 9/16/2015 3:32 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Yes sir!

With a 1 hp Craftsman TS, that I mostly used thin kerf blades on, I was talked into switching to a regular kerf blade by my sharpening service, a Systematic, about 26 years ago. I never looked back. I switched to the Forrest WWII regular kerf in 1999 when I upgraded to a cabinet saw.
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On 9/15/2015 3:36 PM, Leon wrote:

nice, but will it stand up in court. Seems like it's infringing on the use of the sensing technology, which is really a gfci test.
The lowering is different than saw stop, so I don't see that as a risk.
Again, this is job site, not a cabinet saw.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

No, it's significantly different. A least SawStop measures capacitance, not leakage. The difference might not be obvious to you but it's significant enough.

IIRC (it's been a while since I read the patents) the patents claim a blade that retracts when triggered. It doesn't matter how it retracts.

It's still a measure of Gass' patents. If nothing else, he's a good patent lawyer. We'll see if Bosch has better. I'm really surprised Bosch challenged them now.
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says...

Maybe he pissed them off. He seems good at pissing people off.
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