Bosch 1617


Hi All, So today about 1/3 of the way through routing some rabbits my router stopped working. It was functioning without a problem, I turned it off to readjust a piece, and it wouldn't turn back on. I blew it out with compressed air, checked the brushes, tried multiple outlets all to no avail. I was wondering if anyone else has had similar problems, or ideas. I am planning to take it to a repair center tomorrow, but want to avoid a comment like, well did you try "blank" which instantly fixes it.
Thanks in advance for any ideas
Andrew
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clean out the rabbit blood, that might violate the warranty
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God only knows why (Sorry for thr religious thing) but the 1617 has a fantastically flimsy switch.
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On 12 Jun 2005 18:12:48 -0700, "Tattooed and Dusty"

I don't have a 1617 but if it's like my other bosch's I'd bet you've got dust/chips in the switch housing. It's a common problem with this brand. Usually blowing it out with air will do the job. Let us know if this solved the problem.
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If it is mounted in a table, use a switch on an outlet mounted on the table to eliminate that problem as it is just left in the "on" position.
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wrote in message

left it that way.
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I tried blowing the switch out alot with compressed air. I will try some more tomorrow and let everyone know the answer. I use is primarily as a hand held device, so I don't think the offset switch solution will work. I guess I am planning to have it repaired, hopefully it will be quick and painless.
It does present the next question. In the case I am feeling rich tomorrow does the 1619EVS rank in the groups mind. I am still swapping the 1617 in and out of the router table and have been intending to purchase a larger unit to be more or less permanently in the router table. I like the I won't have to buy new template guides and other small parts, but the price is kinda high. Especially if I am going to have to replace the switch after a year or so.
Thanks again for the help so far, and either way I will update everyone on the solution.
Andrew
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Good idea.
I like the I won't have to buy new template guides and other

Once in a table and switched on, you should never have to touch the switch again so it will last about forever.
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On 12 Jun 2005 20:19:37 -0700, "Tattooed and Dusty"
<snip>

I'd been drooling over the 1619EVS ever since it came out, mostly because it seemed to be designed specifically for table mounting. The price kept me from it, but back before last Xmas when Amazon dropped the price to $230 with free shipping I couldnt resist any longer.
I'm glad I got it. With both coarse and fine depth adjustments it's far faster and easier than my ancient 1611EVS was, and it has good power and range of speed adjustment. All in all a fairly well made unit, as most Bosch routers are (1617 being one possible exception :) ).
As a couple of people already mentioned, get one of those router table switches (I think Rockler has one), plug the router in it and leave the router switch on all the time. This will eliminate possible problems with dust jams in the switch housing but is also, I think, a bit safer.
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and it is especially nice to have a variable speed for the table. Besides, I figure they wear out, and it will take twice as long to wear out if you split the work; so it really doesn't cost any more to have several. (or is that rationalization?) My 1617EVS switch broke in the middle of a big project and the local shop wouldn't fix it because I bought it on eBay; so I bought a 1618 to finish the job and left the broken 1617EVS in the table. Then, in about the most amazing thing I have ever experienced, the guy I bought from on eBay sent me a free replacement (though I sent him some money anyhow)! So I have three of them. The 1618 and 1617 have different feels to them; so it is nice to have both.
Yeh, if cost is not an object, I would rather have a larger unit in the table; but I have been using the 1617EVS for 2 years now, and the only time it was underpowered was on a raised panel door; and fortunately I like flat panel doors. So unless you plan on doing a bunch of those...
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Tattooed and Dusty wrote:

If you are electrically inclined, bypass the switch completely and see what happens.
A WORD OF CAUTION:
When you bypass the switch, the router will start as soon as you plug it in if it is the switch.
Plan accordingly.
Lew
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wrote:

IMHO, never bypass the switch on any hazardous tool that has a plug on the cable.
If you do this (and for table mounting routers with "press-button" switches, it's necessary) then cut the plug off first and wire the supply cable into a separately boxed switch.
On the subject of switches, why does the Bosch clog up ? Is it exposed to sawdust in itself, or is it like my Bosch angle grinder where the cooling fan pulls air (and sawdust) in through the gap around the switch slider ? It always switches on, but it can easily wedge itself so you can't turn it off. This makes it hazardous to use with an Arbortech disk.
I'm thinking about stripping my grinder down and fitting some sort of thin sheet "airflow blocker" underneath the switch,
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I wrote:

Andy Dingley writes:

Evidently my suggestion above was not totally clear.
Bypassing a switch is for test purposes only.
The only exception would be when you have a switched wall outlet that could be used to control the start-stop of the tool motor.
Lew
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wrote:

We have a problem in the UK of new (cheap) router models appearing with switches that must be held down in use. Obviously these require butchery (or tie-wraps) before being used in a table.
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So an update, I took the router apart again, removed the switch and blew it out entirely, still to no avail. I can't figure out how to take apart the actual switch itself. There appear to be clips, but I can't get them to depress and I don't want to force it. The beast is still under warauntee, but the repair place is a couple weeks out. I need to look into the cost of simply buying a new switch assuming that's the problem, as I don't want to be routerless for a couple weeks.
Still contemplating buying a 1619evs for the time being...
Andrew
Thanks again for the advice
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On 13 Jun 2005 17:06:41 -0700, "Tattooed and Dusty"

Call the repair guy and see if he can give you a new switch under the warranty. He's either fixed or replaced a bunch of them and may be able to get you one as a warranty repair. You can easily change it yourself.
Mike O.
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Seriously?
Hopefully the switch is in a place where you can still keep the router under control with two hands!?!
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Hi All, A quick update. I shelled out the $4.05 today for a new switch, took three minutes or so and installed it and have a perfectly working router again on my hands.
I also looked at the 1619EVS while at the shop. I have to say it looks like it will be one of the next purchases for the shop.
Thanks again for all the help
Andrew
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Tattooed and Dusty ( snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com) wrote on Sunday 12 June 2005 08:12 pm:

Mine did the same thing while under warranty. The replaced the switch at the service center.
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
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I've had this exact thing happen three times with my 1617EVS. Turns out that (as mentioned by others) the switch itself gets packed with sawdust so that the contact will not work. With patience you fix it as follows:
Safety: Be sure you have the machine UNPLUGGED before you work on it.
1) disassemble the top of the router - two screws if memory serves 2) unplug the spade lug connections from the switch (remember where you parked so you can find your way back - take pictures if necessary) 3) with a small screwdriver, pry the plastic sides of the switch to let the back release. Be careful there are small parts that will fall out like the contact bar and spring. Take it apart slowly so that you can put it back together, sans sawdust, the same way it came apart. 4) Clean out all the sawdust and clean the contact parts as necessary 5) put the switch back together, test it first with a meter (continuity) 6) reattach the spade lug connections 7) make sure all the wires are back in the right place so they don't get pinched when you reassemble to top. 8) reassemble the top
It should be ready to go. As I said, I've done this now three times and so far never had to replace the switch. But the inside of it is always packed completely full of sawdust. Thinking about it now, maybe sealing the switch back with a light film of silicon caulk or something would solve the problem. Might be worth a try. If you keep air from flowing through the switch then it should not accumulate dust in there.
YMMV - could actually be a bad switch. I have no affiliation with Bosch.
Paul Proffitt
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