Bosch 10.8v I-driver

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I thought it was gimmicky at first. Bought it anyway. I'm forever reaching under countertops screwing upwards, always in fear of popping one through (when laminate). The light weight and serious power plus the adjustable angle of the head, makes this a countertopscrewinginstalling dream come true. Good warranty too. (Second Bosch tool I have bought recently which makes me wonder if they're on their way back? Or did I leave?)
http://www.boschtools.com/tools/tools-detail.htm?H 9200&Gp084&Ii859
I'll come back to this in a couple of years.. or when I break it.
r
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...

Interesting - thanks for the mini-review. I was sort of eyeing one of those (or the pistol-shaped one) but couldn't justify the cost, especially since I don't install countertops and I just got a new 12V Panasonic. But I did just see that they're coming with a 10.8V impact driver (PS40) in the same series - and a few early reviews seem very positive. http://toolmonger.com/2007/03/27/hands-on-boschs-108v-litheon-impactor / That might be easier to rationalize if I start a project that requires a lot of screwing... Andy
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positive.http://toolmonger.com/2007/03/27/hands-on-boschs-108v-litheon-impactor /
That looks like a good all around tool too. This thing I bought is solving a very specific problem for me. Most other angle drills are at 90-degrees. This head swivels in locking increment...ideal. for me. Now... if it only had a nice bright LED on the nose....
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How much are those drills? I have a Makita 7.2 volt right angle drill that I have ad since 1983 and the original battery finally quit taking a charge recently. I seldom use the drill because it has little of today's features other than being battery operated. Not keyless, Not VS, No Clutch, Not real strong. I have been reluctant to spend $40 for a new battery or rebuilt as right angle attachments cost about as much and work with any drill. Did you ever used a right angle drill attachment before getting this drill?
Maybe if I get one of these and because the Li-ion batteries are suppose to last at least twice at long it will be good for 46 years instead of the 23 I gout out of the Makita. ;~)
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About $ 150 in your money. Not cheap. But it is not a cheap piece.

That was my rationale behind this purchase. My Milwaukee 14.4, which has done most of its duty a screwdriver, needs 2 batteries. Relatively speaking, the thing is heavy, big and awkward. (For a screw driver that is). I have an 14.4 impact driver, somewhat lighter, still bulky. The clincher was the other day, one of my guys was screwing down a top, and I could have been doing the same thing at the same time. I despise standing around. We also couldn't get past some internal structural wood to attach the counter top. I brought out my Milwaukee angle drill, but the chuck isn't key-less, it is corded, and has NO 'control' over the amount of twist you can give a screw... a lethal situation as this was a custom laminate top and the Milwaukee angle drill has all the balls needed to sink a screw in (through a cup-washer even) and have it pop out the top of the laminate-----> not a good thing.

Yes. I have one of those Milwaukee attachments and love it. But, it is for those rare occasions when you need to get out of a tight spot. This Bosch is going to earn its keep as a dedicated screwdriver, and I will likely buy another.

That Milwaukee 14.4 is going into year 7..and I worked that hard. 2 new batteries are the same money as the bulk of the Bosch, and the Milwaukee would still be what it is.. a bulky old generation cordless. I also haven't had the time to see if the guts are still up to another set of batteries. Just no time. There's a lot happening on the expansion front... all good. Today I'm getting a quote on getting 3-phase 220 in the new building and I'm getting a used forklift checked out by a mechanic before I buy it. If all lease-agreements work out, I will have room for a ShopBot. (Keeping as eye on the forum for a used one. Morris and Rick are already going: "Oh jeeeeezzz here come the questions"...)
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Thanks for the comments. With that info I think I'll go for a right angle adapter as I would not use the drill any where near daily, closer to probably monthly if that. LOL.
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"Robatoy" wrote in message

With your mad CAD skills and a compliant robotic slave, you will soon be master of your little kingdom!
Congrats on the expansion. You apparently have no idea on how to retire.
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On Apr 20, 10:20 am, "Lee Michaels"

I'm hoping the 'Bot will turn my solid surface scraps into accessories as well as do sink-cutouts and cooktop cutouts (the sources of scrap) I won't need a big one.. a 48 x 48 will do, I think... with just a router. I don't have the money to do things big, like Rootes vacuums and silly stuff like that... The business model has to prove itself as its own profit centre. Worse case, I'll end up with a pretty cool toyH^H^H^H^tool.

*Diabolical laughter*.. yes!! Then I will spend all my money opening a soft-cloth-all-hands-only carwash... just to be the dream employer for the local college girls..especially in summer...*wrings hands and drools cueing Jethro Tull's Aqualung*

Thank you. I don't. No idea what it's like to do nothing. On my last trip to Punta Cana DR, I spent quite a bit of time checking out the construction site of a new resort next to the one where we were staying. The construction-super spoke English and answered a lot of my questions. Fascinating. I had never seen so much granite going into 20 buildings, let alone just one. My wife lifted her head off the massage table just long enough to shake it [her head].
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I can't speak for Morris, but I'm certainly willing to answer your questions. Ask away.
One problem I had to deal with is that despite ordering 1" thick sheet plastic, it wasn't 1" ... it varied as much as .020" (+/-) ... some had the equivalent of case hardening (temperature issue with the extruder).
The best one though ... since my bot cuts with an accuracy of about .001" ... I learned I HAVE to allow for some wiggle room when putting parts together. Having a part 6.000" x 6.000" and trying to put it into an opening that is 6.000" x 6.000" requires a press or a BEEG hammer. Now I allow about .003" on both parts and am happy with the results.
BTW ... you're going to need a dust collector. Not some fancy, smancy festy-tool vacuum cleaner ... a real, honest tornado in a box. I've the Delta 1.5 HP dual bag with a cyclone ahead of it. Does well, but my dust shield needs improving on the router.
OK Morris ... your turn!
Regards,
Rick
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On Apr 20, 5:58 pm, "Rick M"

I have seen the kind of community support ShopBot owners lend to each other. Quite fascinating. I would want original software on a stand-alone computer. I'm not even the slightest bit interested in hacking and code-crunching. I'd love to be able to spend the time at some point, but it really has to fulfil its 'work' duty first/as soon as possible. I have to find a way to transfer the templates, which come with different sinks, into an accurate toolpath. I'm making a hole to fit an exsisting sink. for undermounting. Tolerances are 1 mm, maybe even a bit sloppier. The curves are complex ie: http://www.topworks.ca/eclipse.html (click on 'double sinks'). By complex, I mean, no mathematical roots that I am aware of other than the obviously round ones and maybe some corner radii on some rectangular stuff.. A fellow nearby ( 100km), will digitize the odd one for me, and I'll be able to go from DXF to BotTalk<G>. I also have access to a massive scanner, assuming I have a paper template. I can do an auto-trace and go to DXF from there..in house. The other choice would be to do some kind of stylus thing....investigating now, and I could use a nudge if you have one.

I'd be happy with .05. Seriously...in the role as a money maker in my trade.

<g>..got the festy- and feiny-pants stuff already and a 2HP cannisterblower which, with my probe draws 7 amps at 220 volt and it is turning a lot of energy into 'suck' I am satisfied that it will do its job with the 'Bot.
I had wanted to be a bit further along with my planning, but two 86- year old parents are keeping me quite busy.
Thank you for the input, Rick, I always appreciate it.
r
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"Robatoy" wrote

I think that community support is best explained by the fact the ShopBot owners/users are NOT in competition with each other ... on any level. They are all interested in producing their work with a minimum of fuss, and are for the most part not trapped by an overly aggressive ego.

I highly recommend a stand-alone PC with a network connection. I'm using a 300 MHz Pentium running Windows 98 with just network support loaded. No fancy graphics card, a stock VGA CRT is all that's needed. As a result, it boots fast, allows me to run the DOS version of the ShopBot control software with only a minor pause (caused when the DOS app is interrupted for network access).
Code crunching comes in when you're trying to speed production. Morris writes much tighter, faster code than PartWizard ... and that suits his needs. The guy I used to consult for did some path optimization, but he was using the same kerf twice and didn't want parts getting snatched up by the router bit and destroyed (DAMHIKT). I use PartWizard and accept that it will spend a few extra minutes running home after each toolpath is cut (I make multiple tool paths for the various different cuts I make, and I don't edit out the Jog Home and Jog to the first cut position).

I did that for a friend ... he had a custom copper sink made for his kitchen and needed an under-support for the copper (the legs attached to the plywood under-support) rather than have it sag under the granite countertop. Took us about 5 minutes to lay out ... 4 minutes to cut, and it worked just fine. His was a simple rectangle, and I took the widest measurement and added 1/4" to allow for the bend radii.

ShopBot has a 3-D Digitizing Probe available ( http://www.shopbottools.com/accessories.htm ) that will quickly allow you to generate your toolpath. Might be an issue with deep sinks (Z Axis clearance issue). Or ... you could take a digital photo with the sink bottom up, perform an edge-find trace (Corel Trace is great for this), then perform an offset of the shape that conforms to your support requirements (much easier to perform than to describe).

It may well ... I haven't any solid surface experience. If these vacs work with your present cutting practice, you should be ok. Remember though that the ShopBot doesn't take a break during a cut (unless you tell it to do so), so the dust generation is full force. Your broom and dustpan will tell whether you need an upgrade!

My hat is off to you on your priorities.

You're welcome.
Regards,
Rick
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I used one of the Pocket Drivers a while back. That's about the same but pistol shaped. I was completely blown away by the performance -- esp the torque. Definitely not cheap, but if you need a lot of capcacity in a tiny innocent looking form factor it's a bargain.
hex -30-
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wrote:\

I am curious why you were impressed by the torque. I wonder if the torque seems more because of its compact size and you have less leverage holding it to counter act the torque. Looking at the specs at the Bosch site, the torque is listed at 100 inch pounds. The 14 volt drill/drivers state 300 inch pounds. While the 14 volt drill has 40% more voltage, and equal comparison would have the smaller driver closer to a 210 inch pounds.
Not doubting your observation just wondering.
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Excuse me while I butt in.. but with the I-Drive I bought, there's tons of leverage. Way more than an ordinary drill. The little pistol-thingy would be just perfect for hanging cabinets when 100 in/lbs of torque is more than adequate for screwing low-roots through PB... or sideways through face-frames, which you'd pre-drill anyway. None of these drivers are power-houses, but we all already have those in other (corded) incarnations.

The point of these things, is that you can keep one in your tool belt, or pocket. Those things bridge a gap between big guns and manual screw drivers.

back to our regular scheduled programming...
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Yeah, the long handle allows that. My old Makita is about 12" long.

Exactly.
Yes.
True I used to have a "small" 3.2 volt Skil that was impressive for what it was.
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Likely true, it's not going to break your wrist. My impression is probably related to the fact that I was wedged into a tight space where my 18V behemoth could never go and it was infinitely better than trying to twist a stubby screwdriver 1/8th turn at a time. Still think it's a great little tool -- small enough to carry in the trunk or under the truck seat without a second thought, strong enough to be useful.
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This I-Drive sank a 3" deck screw into a regular 2x4 without a hiccup and stalled when the screw head went below flush. It's a scewdriver, not a Magnum HoleShooter.
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Ok, I am with you. 100 inch pounds beats the heck out of the human wrist. I can relate to screwing in tight spots. Hummmm.. Lets stay on track. Many years ago I had 2 small Skil drivers similar in size to the one you used. They were 3.2 volts IIRC, not reeeeeel strong but beat screwing by hand..... Hummm.. The driver even had a locking collar so that you could turn it by hand if its power was not enough. Well, that was 25 years ago.
Thanks for the input.
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In college, I drove a Mini Cooper for a couple of years...say no more...
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Robatoy, Its quite comforting to learn others face the same problems. I'm always apprehensive when it finally comes time to screw down a laminate top onto a run of base cabinets. Run just one screw through the laminate and you've created a disagreable situation. The Bosch angle drill you selected seems to be comfortable tool for the job. Before that was available I replaced a DeWalt 12v drill driver with a Makita 18v Li-ion drill driver. The weight of the 18v Makita was less than the 12v DW. It did have the LED for those upside down on your back dark carcases. You have to remmember to adjust the clutch way down since its got an abundance of torque (450 in-lbs)
<www.makita.com/menu.php?=product_det&tagF452HW> Joe G
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