Bookshelves

Hi there everyone.
I'm new to this newsgroup, and was just looking for some information.
I'm very new at woodworking, and will be buying my tools as I know I need them, but in the meantime, I want to build some bookshelves in my loft. They need to be about 6 feet tall, and cover the entire wall, which is 13'6".
I've been looking online to see if I can find a website that gives some nice plans for something similar to what I want to build, but I'm not finding anything.
Does anyone have any suggestions of where I might be able to find some plans for something like this, or should I just design something myself?
I am going to be taking some courses in woodworking, and already have a couple of books on carpentry, but just wonder if anyone has any tips that might help me out. (I already know that I shouldn't cut my fingers off)
Thanks Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I suggest you go to the library and look at some books on woodworking or home decorating. Also back issues of magazines like Woodworker, Fine Homebuilder, Popular Mechanics, shop notes, workbench, etc. There should be plans in any of them that you could find and adapt to your needs, in about any style you could think of from contemporary to French provincial.
They will also will be for any level of expertise and expense.
Here you can research the library's catalog online which also gives me access to several other libraries in the Northwest. I just mark the ones I want, input my library card #, and the library orders them and sends them to the closest branch to me for pickup.
Good Luck, tHAT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi Chris: Suggest you save the following URL. Very helpful when researching a topic. I just used it for bookshelf plans and found 300 hits. Good luck, JG
http://groups.google.ca/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&group=rec.woodworking
Chris wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I saw some bookshelves on tv awhile back that were kind of intriguing because they were built on a slant - eliminating the need for bookends. The esthetically challenging part being - what do you do with the inevitable triangular shape left over?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris wrote:

Chris, I do not want to appear condescending, but your easiest bet is going to be do it the simple way. By that I mean build three or four cases, each one third or fourth of the total width (outside measurement on each case).
Use pine 1x12x10's or 1x12x12's, whichever works out the more economical for you for the shelves, 1x12x8 for the sides and 1/4" luan for the back of the case. The reason for dividing the width by 3 is to reduce sagging from all those heavy books sitting on those 3/4" shelves. Decide how high you want each shelf and use 3/4 x 3/4 x 11 cleats on the side pieces to attach them to the sides (using screws into the sides and shelves and glue). Essentially what you are doing is making some long glue blocks to join the sides and the shelves. On the back either run a rabbit (a 3/8 wide by 1/4 deep grove along the inside of the back side of the sides (two passes on the table saw will do this nicely, but measure from the "OUTSIDE" of the blade to the fence and REMEMBER which part of the grove you are cutting. When you attach your cleats make sure that your shelves do not extend into it. Then allyou have to do is cut your laun to size and tack it in place on the sides and to the top and bottom shelves.
The approximate 4' shelf length will not overload the 3/4" shelf stock. Another advantage of the narrow width is that they will be easier to move.
The reading will go a long way, but it is not a quick fix for a man who needs bookshelves now.
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The best I've found, and the ones I built, are from back issues of American Woodworker, before it went down hill. They did 3-4 different projects that all used the same basic construction technique. Each shelf standard (divider) is a sandwich of cabinet ply/2x2/cabinet ply. These 3" thick dividers provide a more substantial look and feel than a single 3/4" divider. I drilled mine for shelf pins, but you can also use other systems for the shelf attachment. You could also use doors or drawer units to break up the shelves. I used floor to ceiling shelves. Mine shelf spans are 32" for loads of hardback books. I can send you some pictures if you need them.
--
Ross
www.myoldtools.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep in mind... Bookcases hold a lot of weight. Shelves should be at least 3/4" thick, have a 1.5" lip, and not span more than 30". Fasten the top to the wall. Make sure your floor can take the load.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.