Bookcase/outlet dilemma

Building a bookcase. Not the problem. However, where I want it, it covers an outlet. Now I don't use this particular outlet all that much, in fact I can't recall the last time I did, but looking for suggestions on how to handle it.
1) Move the outlet - possibility - but a hassle.
2) Cut an access hole in the back of the bookcase.
3) Do #2, but also put an extension on the outlet so it will extend a bit into the case.
4) I could shorten the bookcase - very possible.
5) Put the bookcase elsewhere - nope, no other place.
I'm not planning to put the case directly against the wall, meaning I'm not ripping out the baseboard. The baseboard is about 1/2".
Have at it. Willing to hear from many as to solve this.
MJ
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On 4/24/2012 10:39 AM, MJ wrote:

you can get extension cords that have a flat plug and go to the side, so they can be behind things like this.
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On 4/24/2012 12:53 PM, chaniarts wrote:

What he said ...
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I built my daughter a desk with a fully-covered back and she wanted it placed where it blocked an outlet. I resolved that by using an power strip with a flat plug to make power available to the side. Similar to
(Amazon.com product link shortened)35290371&sr=1-2
-- John S.
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If you've got a 1/2" clear, as you say, make up a short, medium-duty, 3-wire (of course) extension cord with a 'right angle plug' on it. Plug it into the outlet, and run the cord off to one side or the other (whichever will put the socket end of the cord in a more 'convenient' position).
*Then* put the book-case in place.
Problem solved.
Note: Put one of the plastic 'safety guards' in the socket when it's not in use, to keep anything from 'accidentally' getting into the socket.
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Here's my take.
Put a flat plug on a cord, and if you have a flat base to the bookshelf (one without and arch or decoration, cut out a square fit an electrical box there. and install an outlet. Now you have something that really functions and is not so bad. It's an extension cord so no harm and it's solid. You can make or buy a cover that matches the wood, or use a contrasting color to highlight it... whatever you want.
On 4/24/2012 1:39 PM, MJ wrote:

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On 4/24/2012 12:39 PM, MJ wrote:

I do this all the time, use an extension cord, there are ones with right angle male ends that do not stick out from the electrical outlett much more than 5/8", Hide the cord behind the cabinet.
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As long as it's a free-standing bookcase, not built-in, it's not considered permanent for purposes of the NEC.
The NEC requires that all wiring boxes be "accessible" and defines the term thus:
"Capable of being removed or exposed without damaging the building structure or finish or not permanently closed in by the structure or finish of the building."
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I wold go with the #2/3 options depending on how much extension was needed. It is easy and you never know when you might want to put a computer photo frame, electric sensory candle, or other electrical device in your bookcase. This would work much better if you attached to the wall.
When we were building our house the electrician recommended putting a receptacle in the back of a vanity upright extension for electric tooth brush charging. Seemed strange but it turned out to be a very good idea.
RonB
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On 4/24/2012 10:39 AM, MJ wrote:

Not a major event...
http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct (9&idcategory=0
Outlet Stamp and Outlet trim ring...
http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct $78
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I cut a hole the size of the outlet in the back of the Ikea Billy bookcase, then put a multiple outlet strip on the shelf. With an on/off switch, so I only draw juice when charging the batteries or using the shredder that are plugged in.
--
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Han
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For me the solution of a flatbacked plug to an outlet strip next to the bookcase was not an option. Of course, if that is an option, it is the better one, despite the vague NEC concerns.
--
Best regards
Han
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What about a socket cover until if and when you want to use the outlet? (Amazon.com product link shortened)35303051&sr=8-4
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On 4/24/2012 2:13 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

MJ: Is this case sitting on the floor a 1/2 inch away from the wall or is it fastened to the wall with a 1/2 inch gap between the case back and the wall?
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MJ wrote:

How to move the outlet:
1. Remove baseboard. 2. Install after-work box somewhere in wall past the bookcase. 3. Run cable from existing box down, then along area that will be covered by baseboard. You may have to remove 1/2" of sheetrock to gain room for wiring. Then up to new box. 4. Replace baseboard. Wire up new outlet. Install cover plate over old outlet.
My best plan, done without seeing your arrangement, would be to remove the baseboard anyway and attach the bookcase to the wall. That way, it will look like it was intended to go there.
There are bookcases with no backs, shelves really. Did you consider that possibility?
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Please, please, please, do _NOT_ ever do this for non-low-voltage wiring.
Think about someone adding another nail to the baseboard in the future.
If the wiring isn't more than 1" deeper than the surface, a nailing plate or metallic conduit is required to protect it from nails, screws, et al.
scott

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Scott Lurndal wrote:

You raise a good point - it's a matter of possibilities and probabilities. How thick of a metal plate do your recommend?
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Something thick enough stop stop a nail. See the nailing plates in the electrical section of your local hardware store. Probably better to just make the appropriate holes in the drywall to wire behind it, then patch.
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

If you use metallic armored cable: BX or AC, you should be okay.
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