Book recommendations please...


Howdy all!
I'm new to woodworking and as some of you may remember from my earlier post about my first completed project (the cedar coffee table) I'm living in a handtool only world.
With that in mind I'm looking for book recommendations anyone has for someone looking to learn how to do many common woodworking tasks with handtools. I'm thinking of things like basic joinery, chisel work, planing, sanding, squaring stock and making straight, smooth cuts with different types of handsaws. Bonus points for anything that contains info on stock selection, finishing and tool maintenance as well. Ideally I'd like a book (or books) that takes a learn by doing approach, preferably with lessons that lead to the creation of interesting or useful items.
I know I could find a big list of woodworking books on Amazon but it's hard to pick the wheat from the chaff when you're a novice, so I figured I ask here first to see if any the other handtool users have any choice reading material that they could recommend. I'm to other instructional materials as well, tapes, DVD's etc... Hell if you can think of anything that should be required reading for any woodworkers I'm open to any advice you have to give!
Cheers,
Josh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Funky Space Cowboy wrote:

[snip]
Books and writing styles can be such a subjective thing, it's really hard to recommend (at least for me) such books.
My suggestion to you would be to hit the library either in your hometown or a larger nearby town or city. Look and see what they have on the shelves, check a few out (literally)and take them home to check out (figuratively).
When you find one you like, buy it and keep it on your reference shelf.
One of the first books I bought probably 30+ years ago - after checking it out from the library - was "Cabinetmaking and Millwork" by John Feirer. It's still available and can be had as a used hardcover for as little as $2.95, new for around $35 in the more recent edition.
Did a quick Google search and found, as one example:
http://www.alibris.com/search/books/author/Feirer,%20John%20L
Many of the Fine Woodworking books (Taunton Press) offer excellent insight into hand tool craftsmanship. In particular, look for Tage Frid's 3 volume series. Instructional, these books are classics.
Again, hit the library before you buy. Don't overlook inter-library loan for these books if you're in a smaller library, they can and will get you books from all over the country.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

These were one of the first books I got, and I also found them helpful.
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 08 Sep 2005 20:02:34 -0500, Funky Space Cowboy wrote:

The Practical Woodworker edited By Bernard E. Jones.
This book covers 19th and 20th century methods and tools. Photos of workmen with vests and ties, oh my! Of course the book has nothing on Japanese saws or water stones, and glues have come a long way since its publication. For basic hand tool operations, this is a fine book. There is a companion volume, The Complete Woodworker, which expands on the joinery examples of the first volume.
Others may suggest Tage Frid's books. While they are indeed excellent books, they do contain a fair amount of power tool information. From your criteria, I'd suggest leaving them till later.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Funky Space Cowboy wrote:

I'd recommend Aldren Watson's _Handtools: Their Ways and Workings_. It's got good pictures and covers a wide range of tools with basic instructions on their use.
Check it out on Amazon, as the listing has one of those "search inside" features so you can look at the table of contents and index to see if it appeals to you.
Chuck Vance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If your in Texas, check the following site. They offer basic courses that will jump start your effort, for not much cost. If in another state, look for similar programs.
http://www.homesteadheritage.com/index.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.