Book recommendations

What are the THREE books that have been the most useful to you in your woodworking pursuits?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ben wrote:
> What are the THREE books that have been the most useful to you in your > woodworking pursuits?
Not a purist, simply a hacker and amateur boat builder.
Fred Bingham's, Practical Yacht Joinery, suits me fine.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a bookshelf full of woodworking books and it would be hard to say which I find most useful. It depends on what sort of project I'm undertaking. There is one book I have found to be indispensable: the Checkbook.
Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
First one isn't a book, Second one I don't own, Third one you can't buy.
Shopnotes Good book on Finishing Common Sense
Not trying to be a smart ass either, but those, plus the help of the group, is pretty much all I need for the woodworking I do. Google also tops the list.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

DeCristofero's Complete Book of Wood Joinery
Tolpin's "Measure Twice, Cut Once"
David Pye's "The Nature and Esthetics of Design"
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1.) The Complete Book of Woodworking: Detailed Plans for More Than 40 Fabulous Projects at Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/yvb6or Probably won't become a woodworking classic, but this single book is one of the primary things that got me in to woodworking. Good intro to wood, tools, and techniques, plus some plans for basic projects. I built the step stool and haven't looked back! Lee Valley has a newer version with some different projects.
2.) Google.com obviously not a book, but I've probably learned more from the web than any other single source. First place I tend to look is the archives here, and highlandhardware.com has a BUNCH of helpful pdf articles in their "library" section. Other than that, a variety of sites by professional and amateur woodworkers, manufacturers or retailers, reviewers, and whatever else turns up in a given search.
3.) Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner http://tinyurl.com/2la5yt Finishing is an important part of every project, and this book does a great job of explaining what's really going on with the different types of finish, as well as how to apply them.
Honorable mention: (I'd consider the following excellent books, but some are more specific, or maybe they just don't quite make my top 3)
The Custom Furniture Sourcebook: A Guide to 125 Craftsmen http://tinyurl.com/2g9t84 Not a how-to book by any means, but it sure is fun to look through - great sources of inspiration in a variety of styles.
Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit, and Use by Toshio Odate Again, not a lot of how-to stuff, but it is a fascinating read.
The Workbench Book by Scott Landis Woodworking Tools Catalog by Lee Valley Band Saw Handbook by Mark Duginske The Complete Illustrated Guide to Furniture and Cabinet Construction by Andy Rae Mission Oak and Cherry Collection (recent catalog) by Stickley
Thanks - I'm curious to see others' lists, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tage Frid
Hoadley's "Understanding Wood"
One of my furniture history books, such as Charles Hayward's.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

SIMPLIFIED ELECTRICAL WIRING Author: Sears? http://www.tbellsbooks.com/si/10-30002557.html
WOODSHOP JIGS AND FIXTURES Author: NAGYSZALANCZY, SANDOR http://www.woodworkerslibrary.com/product.php?productid 966&cat=0&page=1
THE WORKBENCH Author: Schleining, Lon http://www.woodworkerslibrary.com/product.php?productid 147&cat=0&page=1
Even though the first book has nothing to do with wood except maybe how to drill through it and run a fish tape you can't have a workspace without knowing how to run outlets and install lights.
If Magazines count I would add Wood Magazine.
Why THREE books?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have an extensive book collection, mostly because I had been writing a book review column for Canadian Woodworking for a while and publishers provided books to me for review.
The ones I value the most are the ones about tuning and using tools, particularly for the Router, which is the most versatile tool in the shop (Router Magic tops that list)
Others include the following:
Identifying Wood and Understanding Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley
The Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery and Shaping Wood, published by Taunton
The Fine Art of Cabinetmaking by James Krenov - a great read by a master.
The Fine Art of Tools - published by Taunton - truly eyecandy for woodworkers
Of course, the problem with any list is that it not only leaves off a huge number of other great books, it probably won't reflect your own interests. I also have great books on carving, woodturning and really intersting project books, such as "Marvelous Transforming Toys.
Finally, the best 'book' on my shelf is the annual Lee Valley Tools catalog!
Michel www.woodstoneproductions.com Wood Portal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ben wrote:

1. Encyclopedia of Furniture Making
2. UnderstandingWoodFinishing
3. The Complete Guide to Sharpening
-- It's turtles, all the way down
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think every would love to have this book in their collection:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)Y5TUCCVJ7DGE
It'll be out in about a week or two. Full disclosure: I worked on this book, as did other Wreck regulars including Charlie Self and AJ Hamler (the editor of this particular volume).
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

_________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Forgive me if this is given knowledge, but why "Collins"?
-- Kurt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<Forgive me if this is given knowledge, but why "Collins"?>>
Because the publisher is Harper Collins.
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

_________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Gordon wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)Y5TUCCVJ7DGE
Excellent!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ben wrote:

Broad area this woodworking thing - solid wood furniture, ply and face frame cabinets, turning, carving, sculpture, . . . Then there's hand tools vs power tools, maintenance, sharpening, . . .
For solid wood furniture making
Krenov - any of his books - for an aproach to furniture making Encylcopedia of Furniture Making - to understand what the parts are and what they do - especially the stuff you don't see from the outside Di Cristafora's book on joinery - being aware of a couple hundred ways to hold two pieces of wood together gives you options once you've decided what you're going to make
For play and face frame
Loaned my copy so I'm not sure of the name or author but it's in a 3 ring binder. Has drawings of standard cabinets and drawer units, with parts list, cuts layout, assembly order and tips on making things easier
Router Magic - routers make this type of work easier
Turning
Anything by Richard Raffan
Carving
Anything by Nora Hall
Sharpening - Leonard Lee's book
More specifics for the question please.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.