book recommendation wanted

As a woodworker I am an amateur, beginner, and not very talented. Well, maybe moderately talented. U tube has been very instructive for me in learning some woodworking techniques but I feel that a good book or two on the subject would be very useful. I would like to know more about joinery and the use of those tools that might be found in the better equipped home/garage shop. I have had a table saw for more than 30 years, and a router. More recently I've gotten a drill press, planer, router table, and discovered Kreg jigs. I've also discovered that there is other wood besides A-C plywood, douglas fir, and pine. I'm looking for a jointer now. I'd like to eventually be able to make a nice raised panel cabinet door.
A couple of my favorite books over the last 30-40 years have been "Basic Handtools" (a U.S. Navy training manual), and "Basic Carpentry Illustrated" (a Sunset book). But, they are somewhat dated and don't include much in the way of joinery, especially as relating to furniture and cabinetry.
So, what's a couple of good books that I should have in my shop for instruction and reference? Maybe Santa might be able to find one and put it under my tree.
Ralph
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/12/2010 10:50 AM, Ralph wrote:

[snip]
> > So, what's a couple of good books that I should have in my shop for > instruction and reference? Maybe Santa might be able to find one and put > it under my tree.
So many techniques... so little time<g>
One the the first books that I gravitated to and snagged for my "shop library" was
"Cabinet Making and Millwork" by John L. Feirer (Bennett Publishing Company, Peoria, IL 1967,1970, 1977, 1982)
Almost 1,000 pages of great information on all facets of woodworking.
Should be able to find a copy on the internet... don't know if it's still published or not. My copy is the 2nd Edition.
I don't think I've seen a better "all round source" to this day. Of course, my library also includes complete set of Fine Woodworking magazine and many of their excellent books.
I think a book like Feirer's will cover almost all the bases and then, when you zero in on a specific technique that you intend to use, you might wish to browse some of the FWW topics or publications to get deeply into the subject.
Same thing goes for those books and magazines devoted to the tools themselves. There are a lot of compendiums that propose to tell you all you need to know about power or hand tools but I find that, in practice, most are so general that you learn such interesting things as "a ball pein hammer is used by metal workers and machinists" or "the claw on a carpenter's hammer is used primarily for nail removal"<g>
This is one area where you want to get a book dedicated to the specific tool if you want to learn valuable tip, tricks, etc. Start with reading and/or committing to memory the manufacturer's guide for the tool and then go browse through any number of books dedicated to a) the particular tool or b) a specific use of that tool.
Be sure to check out the offerings at the local library. The breadth of their collection of woodworking and craft books may surprise you. I know it did me. Take home a load of them and really dig through them. I quickly found a number that were so basic that the most advanced techniques discussed were ones I mastered in 7th grade woodshop<g> No need to waste time or money with them. Others I found were so good that I didn't wish to be troubled returning to the library if I wanted to reference something in the book so I bought my own.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/12/2010 11:25 AM, Dddudley wrote:

Amazon.com has the book in several editions. In fact, you can purchase a used 5th edition (992 pages) for only $.40 (yes, forty cents) plus $3.99 shipping on Amazon. Just point your browser to http://tinyurl.com/2ff3foh and order.
Don
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have been manufacturing sawdust for 30+ years - a little more seriously for the past few years. One of the books I go back to on a regular basis is "Cabinetmaking and Millwork" by John L. Feirer, Bennett & Company - 900+ pages. My version was purchased when I took a college intro to cabinetmaking class in the mid 70's and has a latest copyright of 1970. I did some checking a few years ago and it has been updated and apparently has some teaching guides available. Try Amazon or local libraries for up to date info. The version I have is clearly outdated. BUT, some of the material will probably not change. It provides basic & classic cabinet making, the tool operating and safety instruction is still valid and it is well illustrated with photos and very good perspective and exploded perspective drawings. When I am scratching my head trying to figure out a case design this is the one I pull off of the shelf.
Taunton Press has several pretty good books that provide inspiration, if not instruction. I received a tree book set for Christmas, a few years ago, that I got to fairly frequently. These are the "Workshop Book" by Scott Landis; The "Workbench Book" by Landis and "The Toolbox Book" by Toplin. The Workshop book, in particular, provides a lot of workshop design information and examples of well-executed shop plans. As noted, these are not as instructive as the cabinetmaking book, above, but they provide some good ideas and inspiration. If they are going on your Christmas list, they should be pretty easy to find.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 12 Dec 2010 08:50:16 -0800, Ralph wrote:

I like "Encyclopedia of Furniture Making" by Ernest Joyce. More of a summary than a how-to but it shows just about every joint and technique of western woodworking.
For details on joinery I like Tauntons "Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery".
And for some nice project ideas there's "Illustrated Cabinet Making" from American Woodworker. Don't be fooled by the title, it shows tables, beds, desks. and chests as well as cabinets. Only a few dimensions given, it's not a cut list but it shows all you need.
And look on abebooks for used copies to save a lot of money and find ones that are out of print.
http://www.abebooks.com /
For example, the Joyce book can be had in good condition for as little as $6 including shipping.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/12/2010 10:50 AM, Ralph wrote:

a couple of people mentioned this book. it's still available on amazon.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)92178571&sr=8-1
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looks like good prices too. That might be less than I paid back in the mid-70's. The four reviews are no surprise either.
RonB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph wrote: ...

And, for a different take (altho I don't disagree w/ any of the previous posters' suggestions each of which has provided reasons for the choice; all valid)...
Two from Taunton Press (vintage but think they're both still in print; I'm sure Hoadley is) --
Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: Joinery and Techniques, Vol 1
Bruce Hoadley, Understanding Wood.
Frid was the first Contributing Editor when Fine Woodworking was founded so it's of some age back. It concentrates on various joinery techniques w/ first emphasis on hand cutting them as well as machine technique. One can never underestimate how limiting it is in advancing if one only knows using power tools for everything.
The second is the tome on what every woodworker needs to know about the properties and idiosyncracies of the material with which they propose to work. Much hard effort and work is lost to misunderstanding the limitations of the wood.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've always recommended "The Fundamentals of Fine Woodworking" by Ferencsik. It's a very basic start, not an encyclopedia of joints. Covers other basics too (layout, sharpening, &tc.).
And a few hours with Hoadley's "Understanding Wood" will pay off substantially for the rest of your life.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also, I've found some of the DVD's and online videos on the FWW website to be informative and a confidence builder.
-Zz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Zz Yzx wrote:

Hard to complain about "The Joint Book" by Terrie Noll for the $10 or so you can get it for (last time I checked).
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

Hard to complain about a book on SketchUp too, if the reader is so inclined and interested in design.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.