Bois D'arc (or Bo-darc) use?

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Is this wood good for anything? I know it's hard as sin. Only time I have ever seen sparks fly from a chain saw when chopping down a tree... But it has this gorgeous yellow color to it. Anyone have any experience with wiping out some chisels trying to turn this stuff? I have BOAT LOADS of it around my house...
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I've turned some into bowls. The color will deepen into an orange-brown over time - faster with exposure to light, plus it is good practice sharpening.
Not too bad turning green, a bit more a challenge dry. Worth he trounble in my opinion - wish I had more!
Jim
Dave & Tricia Claghorn wrote:

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Dave & Tricia Claghorn ask:

GO FOR IT! Stuff is hard to work, but gorgeous. Turns wonderfully, glues well, finishes beautifully. Avoid penetrating finishes if you want to keep that bright orange-yellow color. Great small project wood, hard to find, expensive (over 10 bucks a bf).
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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Dave & Tricia Claghorn wrote:

Assuming you're in the US it's got another name, "Osage Orange". If you google the archives for this newsgroup you'll find quite a lot of discussion of Osage Orange.
If you're in South America there's another wood that goes by that name concerning which there doesn't seem to be a lot of information available.
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--John
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Bois D'arc trunk sections are typically used for piers in pier-and-beam farmhouse construction - very durable. They are also used for corner posts in barbed-wire fences.
On Tue, 11 May 2004 05:32:40 -0400, "J. Clarke"

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"Thomas Kendrick" wrote in message

In this part of Texas they often _are_ the posts for barbed wire fences as they are commonly seen on fence lines, particularly along old cotton fields.
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Swingman writes:

Said to be the most durable U.S. wood.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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I dunno. Legend has it that if you put a rock on top of a black locust post, you'll wear out the rock twice before the post rots.
JE
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Jon Endres responds:

Believe me, it's legend. I've replaced too many old locust posts to believe they'er exceptionally durable. But those posts were OLD. Maybe 50 years. And that area of Virginia is hard on any kind of posts. I've laid PT wood, treated for in ground use, on the ground to hold other wood up, and within a year, the termites have gnawed the PT stuff to nothing.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
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Swingman wrote:

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Richard,

Richard L. Rombold
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snipped-for-privacy@panaband.com says...

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Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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On Tue, 11 May 2004 05:10:21 GMT, Dave & Tricia Claghorn

The name seems to suggest making bows, like yew. I don't know anyone who has tried it. Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a
Ask not with whom the buck stops . . .
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It's a great accent wood and fun to carve...with very sharp knives.
In Texas it's know as Bodark or Horse Apple after its green fruit, about the size of a baseball. Horse apples will render your horse quite ill, yet they still eat it.
Rodney, are you related to Eric Myrvaagnes?
RB
Rodney Myrvaagnes wrote:

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the size of a softball. The male tree does not, so you can have the tree without the fruit.

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Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a
Ask not with whom the buck stops . . .
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Dave & Tricia Claghorn wrote:

A Neander-Club
http://www.shavings.net/images/club.jpg
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John G. in Memphis, TN Have a nice......... night.
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As others have stated, the more common name (at least around here) is osage orange. My father also refers to it as "hedge", as it is often seen along fence lines. IIRC, the Plains Indians used it for bowmaking back in the day. My father uses it to make signs to go over the entrance to a long driveway or lane with the owner's name.
todd
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Dave & Tricia Claghorn wrote:

Archers love to make bows from it. I personally prefer to make bowls. Absolutely gorgeous, but turn it green, when it's dry it's very hard to work. It frequently has faults that run trough it and won't be found until it's cut into. If nothing else, cut a 2-3 ft section and put your anvil on top.
Dave in Fairfax
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reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
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Considered one of the best woods for making bows- also one of the most difficult, from what I hear- takes practice. Lots of info out there. You can find a lot by doing a Google search. There is also a three-volume set- "The Traditional Bowyer's Bible"- outstanding stuff, and will teach you a lot about wood in general that you never realised before. The chapter on making bowstrings has always been the most fascinating part to me, though...
Steve

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Wow! So many great responses... And all I thought it was good for was dulling chainsaw blades and dropping big-ass fruits all summer long in my back yard...
Thanks. I may have to give this stuff a shot...
On 5/11/04 23:36, in article snipped-for-privacy@enews2.newsguy.com, "Steve

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