Blue Glue

About 6 months ago I replaced a dowel in a table leg. The wood is dark and fine-grained and looks like cherry. The leg is fastened to the upright with two dowels about 5/8 " diameter. I glued both dowels with titebond 2.
Yesterday the leg and post came back. It had come off again. The glue on the new dowel was still soft and colored blue. Any ideas why yellow glue would not set up, and why it turned blue? Would residue of hide glue do this?
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 GW Ross 

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On 6/8/2013 10:47 AM, G. Ross wrote:

No telling, but you best answer will come from here.
http://www.titebond.com/contact_us.aspx
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On 6/8/2013 1:10 PM, Leon wrote:

Just as a follow up, this type of repair can be problematic. I have done similar. If you did not create totally new, clean, fresh wood surfaces the glue often fails. Typically you have to drill the hole out to the next larger size, flush cut the dowels, and drill the next size up and put in larger dowels. There is just something about fresh glue not adhering well to old dried glue. My finding is that sanding the old hole and dowel is not enough.
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G. Ross wrote:

pedestal table. It belongs to a retired military family and has been around the world with them. Apparently on the front lines. The legs have been replaced using big screws, 10 penny nails, finish nails, etc. I had to pull out a 10d common nail before I could get into the joint.
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That looks like a more modern preglued dowel. The type glue I am thinking about is activated by radio frequency.
Back to your soft glue that did not set up and my previous comment about the old glue still being present. Typical wood glue has to soak into the wood to cure. If there was still a layer of the old glue sealing the hole the glue that you used was probably sealed in an air tight and sealed from bare wood situation. Basically no where for the moisture in the glue to go.
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On 6/8/2013 5:30 PM, Leon wrote:

reacting with the titebond causing the blue hue...
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Jeff

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On Saturday, June 8, 2013 4:34:02 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

I doubt the Titebond-Hide (old) glue is reacting. I've never seen anything as that.
Another possibility: Your initial repair didn't hold, possibly because of old glue remaining in the hole and the new glue didn't bond properly. The table owner tried to use their (there, they're, thar) kid's (blue colored) craft glue to repair it, and didn't tell you they tried to repair it that w ay.
Sonny
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On 6/8/2013 4:30 PM, Leon wrote: ...

For 6 months??? Nah...I'm not buying that.
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Umm glue does not cure in the air tight bottle after several tears. How else would you explain the glue not curing.
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I never cry into my glue, but have forgoten to seal the bottle then cried out an expletive.
I know I am being a smart ass.
Mark
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Leon wrote:

Dremel tool to give it more grip. The glue on the other end (inside the table leg) has set and is firm and almost clear. Maybe they did try to fix it with something else, but the son who brought it was surprised and wondered if I used blue glue.
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Maybe the blue comes from a copper bearing wood preservative like copper napthenate. CuNap has been in use since the late 1800s: http://www.merichem.com/resources/technical_papers/copper_naphthenate_as_wo od_preservative/index.php Maybe the wood preservative was also used as a stain.
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Good info. However consider this wood might be a 'Rose Wood' and therefore absorbs a lot from the ground to color itself and at the same time become high in silica that eats up our saws and tools.
Copper is common in volcanic areas and rivers are rich in it in the central Americas and South Americas.
Either man made, or nature supplying the source.
Martin
On 6/9/2013 10:34 AM, Denis G. wrote:

http://www.merichem.com/resources/technical_papers/copper_naphthenate_as_wood_preservative/index.php

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Old copper pennies soaked in vinegar can turn the solution blue. I wonder if a rag soaked in vinegar and wiped on the wood (maybe underneath the table) might also leave a blue stain on the cloth.
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On Saturday, June 8, 2013 8:47:39 AM UTC-7, G. Ross wrote:

Kind of goolish. I always use epoxy for these types of fixes. I find System 3 T-88 as a great option.
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On 6/10/2013 1:46 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

That's what I used this time (after getting rid of the blue stuff.
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Fresh hide glue wouldn't have given you problems. In fact, it would have melted into the old and held like the joint was welded. You wouldn't be able to break the dowels on that old Duncan Pfyffe with a 10 lb maul. Assuming you didn't scrape out the old hide glue, you still have a chance of cleaning out the Titebond with the usual rag and hot water.
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