Blotchy Cherry Stain

Page 1 of 2  
I'm trying to stain some cherry wood and just seem to get blochy results. I'm using a gel stain which is doing much better than the thin stuff. I'm putting it on evenly and wiping off the excess. Is it in the wood or the stain or the application method? Any help would be appricated.
Thanks George
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Miniwax brand, right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Miniwax brand, right?
No, actually I was using Rockler Mission Cherry Stain. I did try thinning it out some with Miniwax and worked nice on one test pc but on the next one it was terrible. I don't use miniwax by itself at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, staining woods like Cherry and Maple, Birch tend to be kinda tough to start with. You will have a bit more control with the gels.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some woods just don't like to be stained. They act like they love you and when you commit they laugh at you and tell you that your mom dresses you funny. My experience has been to use a surface stain instead of a penetrating stain. You would seal the wood with a clear coat and then apply the stain over the sealed wood. The stain is translucent so you can see the grain, and you get nice even coverage and no splotches. The up side is you can change the color later if you decide to. max

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A beautiful idea! Thanks.
Bjarte
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What do you use for a clear coat? A sanding sealer or something like that? Can you recommend a specific product? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frosty Thunder wrote:

staining cherry is very hard. even with gel stain i've never been able to get it non-blotchy.
that's why i use dye and toner coats.
works for me. there are people who know far more about finishing cherry than i do. personally i don't like that dark red look - i'm a fan of natural cherry with a hint of red-brown toner.
---- dz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try a water-based dye, or if you have access to the equipment try spraying light coats.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 22:12:13 -0500, "Frosty Thunder"

When I stain blotchy woods like cherry and birch I head in one of two directions.
#1 - most often - I apply a barrier coat of Seal Coat, then wipe on a Behlen's pigment stain. The stain is dry brushed while it's wet until it's even. Watch for pigment build-up in corners and at edges. For more color. apply another barrier coat and add another treatment of the same or a different color pigment stain. (optional) Apply a light colored dye, like Solar Lux before the first barrier. Use a barrier between each product until you begin to add clear top coats. I lightly scuff the top coats with 320 grit to keep things smooth and remove dust nibs.
#2 - add colorant to a clear lacquer and build color as I spray clear top coats. Don't try to do this in one coat, build color slowly.
#1 will not usually work with Home Center brands of stain, they will never dry. The H.Behlen and Mohawk lines handle much differently and dry much faster than cheaper stuff. So, if you try the method with different materials and it dosen't work, don't blame me. <G>
Practice on scrap!
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good approach. I use linseed to condition yellow birch, a truly bad actor in the stain department, or aspen, which suffers from the same interlocked grain problem. It won't stain as dark, of course, because it doesn't penetrate as well, so start a tint or two beyond in your test.
wrote:

SNIP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Howdy,
Built my kitchen cabinets and island out of Cherry plywood, with solid cherry face frames.
1. I wiped on a thinned layer of clear shellac to all surfaces (the cherry plywood and solid cherry face frames) Allowed shellac coat to dry for an hour, then lightly sanded.
2. Next, I applied Minwix Gel Stain to all surfaces as indicated in the can. Wiped off the excess within 3 minutes.
3. Allowed stain to dry for 24 hours, scuff sanded, then sprayed several coats of polyurethane. Allow each coat to dry and scuff sand. Last coat obviously gets no sanding.
The results were exceptional. No blotchiness whatsoever. The shellac controls overpentration of the gel stain, which in itself does not penetrate very far.
Hope this helps. Good Luck. -Albert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
try applying a coat of 2# shellac as a conditioner followed by a gel stain. I've done that with good results.
Frosty Thunder wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cherry is almost always blotchy when stained. You can use a "wood conditioner" or "Pre-stain". I know everyone hates Minwax around here but they make one you can get at the Borg. It will help a some, but with Cherry it is really difficult to get good results.
One trick I use is try test pieces that have been sanded with various weights of sand paper. For instance, a piece sander to just 120 will likely stain much more evenly than one sanded to 400. You can get good results with the 120 if you use a light hand and take your time. Too fine of a grain sanding can make using pigment stains difficult to get get good penetration and tone.
Another idea is to try using an anoline or other dye stain. A bit more difficult and less forgoving and not always better, but maybe worth a try. You can get some pre-mixed versions of the non-grain raising NGR from the nice folks at Wood Finishing Supply.com.
Finally, Cherry darkens with sunlight. It happens real quick with direct light. Try some Tung oil and turpentine then set it under a sun lamp or outdoors.
BW

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Spray on water based dye. It will come out perfect, as long as you apply ONLY "dry" coats and build up the color gradually.
David
Frosty Thunder wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cherry looks so nice all by itself, there is nothing I would suggest stainwise to improve upon what nature did here. Maybe a little tung oil to pop the grain, and a topcoat of shellac/wax.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If your customer or your wife wants dark cherry, you really need to learn how to stain cherry!
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Why do so many find that so hard to grasp? <G>
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Dark cherry? Is there any other kind? That's where it all ends up anyway. That's why god invented the "ultra violet" section of the spectrum of light.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
of_the snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (todd the wood junkie) wrote in

And if you don't want to wait on natural light, you can always use ~1/2 tsp of lye to 1 cup of water. Darkens it as far as it will ever go in about 10 seconds. The bad news is that all cherry won't get to the same level of darness so you need to do this early and match your pieces. The good news is that if you sand through the darkened wood you just have to re-apply the lye mixture. It darkens up the light wood and leaves the already darkened wood with no change. I've done 2 beds this way and it looks beautiful.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.