Blooming

Please forgive me if I'm on the wrong Newsgroup with this question.
After polishing my oak dining room table it still leaves marks, a friend tells me it could be the "Blooming" effect but knows nothing more. Any ideas on how to clear it?
PS I've placed this on here because of the subject - Woodworking and just thought someone could give me a lead.
Thanks
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Bill did say:

You may find some of these folks have expertise in this area... What do these marks look like?
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After polishing it looks "cloudy - Hazy" and the more I rub the worse it gets!

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@btinternet.com says...

It's quite possible what you are experiencing is blush not blooming. A term I've never heard used to describe a problem with a finish.
Blush is a whites haze in the finish. It is usually indicative of a lacquer finish that has had a hot coffee cup left on it or a wet glass, that sort of thing.
It is caused by moisture infiltrating the finish.
If, in fact, that is the problem what you have to do is displace the moisture. There are several painless options open to you.
Formsbey has a commercial blush remover that can usually be found at Lowe's, Home Depot, good hardware store. Apply as directed.
An oily substance left over the blush for some period of time will do the job. Petroleum jelly, peanut butter. Yes, really, peanut butter. Look up why it sticks to the roof of the mouth.
A wipe of two with an alcohol dampened rag should do the trick also. Not knowing what the finish actually is I'd use that carefully. Chances are very slim it is a shellac finish but if were the alcohol could dim it.
If we are not talking blush a better description of the rather vague "marks" would certainly be in order I've wasted a lot of time.
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MikeG
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wrote:

I believe that blush is something that occurs when finish is applied. When solvent evaporates from the wet film finish, it lowers the temperature at the surface of the wet film. If the surface temperature falls below the dew point, moisture condenses on the film and is adsorbed. The incompatible moisture is seen as blush.
For obvious reasons, blush is more apt to occur when there is high humidity. http://mywebpages.comcast.net/wgoffeney/Woodworking/Woodworking.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Hi Wally
Blush is the whitish haze that appears in a finish. Either during application, for the reasons you state, or, in the case of the OP, when moisture infiltrates and existing finish. Regardless of how when it appears blush is blush.
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On Sun, 26 Sep 2004 11:46:30 +0000, Bill wrote:

Bill, we have a sister group at alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking. You may get more help if you post a couple of pix there.
--
Joe Wells


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iirc, blooming is caused by excessive stearates in lacquer. it looks like blush tho. bob
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That'd be fisheye, I presume. Soap is slick, lacquer won't stick.
Blush is normally trapped subsurface moisture, which, I suppose, heat produced by friction - "rubbing"- might exacerbate.

like
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Lacquer doesn't contain sterates, Sanding sealer does, lacquer over sanding sealer doesn't discolor and if it did it certainly doesn't just magically appear somewhere down the road.
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MikeG said:

term I've never heard used to describe a problem with a finish.
to which i replied:

blush tho.
"George" added:

and MikeG appended:
Lacquer doesn't contain sterates, Sanding sealer does, lacquer over sanding sealer doesn't discolor and if it did it certainly doesn't just magically appear somewhere down the road.
and i reply:
i've not heard of fisheye being caused by stearates, but i'm not a lacquer expert. it seems to me if this were a problem, the stearates in lacquer sealer would be of concern tho.... and i do know there are 1 or 2 lacquers out there that contain stearates, tho most vinyl and pre-cat lacquers do not. as it was explained to me, bloom will occur shortly after lacquer application if the lacquer was manufactured excessive stearates. it looks like blush, but moisture is not the cause. my post wasn't to dispute his problem, which is probably blush, but to define bloom. perhaps my memory is incorrect tho. bob
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A little more info on "Blooming Effect" was gained yesterday my a work colleague, and he says it caused my "silicone" in the polish!
Over the last couple of years my wife has in fact used "Pledge" and the like to polish and this does contain Silicone, so I may well be getting closer to an answer.

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