Bleeding air out of compressor


I just got a new 60 gallon CH oiler compressor. In the past I left the air pressure in my old pancake compressor each night I do drain the water out each week but planned on just leaving it pressured at the end of the day. I do have a cut off value on the output which for now I have been remembering to turn off. Any problem with leaving it pressured between water drains.I don't have a filter on the output yet but plan on that also. I have also ordered a auto drain for it from HF Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, you paid to compress the air, why waste it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hope you have better luck with your CH than I did. The unloader valve went bad at 13 months (with very little use - and it is located in an A/C'd part of my shop). Then the motor went out at 15 months. Thought about getting a new IR compressor but went with for a new GE motor at Graingers instead (but like the original Emerson motor, the GE is also made in Mexico). Inspite of the fact that the 60 gallon tank is plastered with a big sign that says 3-yr warranty, CH technicians pointed out that the sign also says (in very small letters) "limited" warranty. When asked what the 3-yr warranty covers, they replied it covered only the compressor and (I think) the tank. Electrical parts are 12 month warranty.
BTW, don't worry about relieving the compressed air every night. That is not a problem, and, as another poster noted, you paid to compress the air you would be setting free, so use it. But IMMEDIATELY get a filter, oil, and water remover on the exit to the tank. You don't want contaminents getting in your downstream piping/hoses.
Good luck. I have purchased my last CH product.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith wrote:

I am curious about the auto drain you mentioned. I looked at the HF web page http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberB221
I do not understand when the discharge occurs. Is it every time the tank reaches a particular pressure setting?
I also don't understand what "Operates from any interrupted air signal" means. Can you explain what an interrupted air signal is for me"?
Cheers,
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

compressor shuts off and the pressure is relieved the drain is momentarially opened also.

See above explanation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No problem with leaving it pressurized all the time. If it's running every day I would drain the water every day, but there's no need to blled down all the air pressure.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Keith wrote: > I just got a new 60 gallon CH oiler compressor. In the past I left the air > pressure in my old pancake compressor each night I do drain the water out each > week but planned on just leaving it pressured at the end of the day. <snip>
SFWIW, have an 80 gal, vertical tank.
Last thing Sunday, shut off power, open 1/2" ball valve on bottom of tank which blows out the water and depressurizes the tank.
Close the valve before you restart the compressor<G>.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

or actually - pain in the knees - to get under the tank to open the valve. I've got a set of projects coming up, where I *have* to use the compressor. First thing I'm going to do is to relocate the valve to a more accessable position. There are automatic drain valves that kick in for 5-10 seconds per hour, but you really need a drain, and they're intended for commercial installations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Smaug Ichorfang" wrote in message

I moved the drain plug to the end of a 3' length of air hose on my small vertical, where it is much more accessible.
The air hose holds quite a bit of water that would otherwise be in the tank, and, unlike the tank, is rustproof ... and gravity does the work.
It is a simple matter to open the cock slightly every other day or so and let the water in the hose squirt out, and draining the tank this way doesn't even cause the compressor to cycle on.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 8/13/06
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's a cleaver way to drain the tank and keep moisture out between drains. Thanks

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.