Black look in joins?

I was looking at some photos of bandsaw boxes when I noticed that on one, the joins where the different pieces were re-glued back together, seemed to have a neat black line between the two pieces. It gave it a nice hi-lite on the join rather than trying to hide it. How is this done?
I remember seeing something similar on boat decking where there was a black line between the boards that made up the deck.
Thanks Jaz.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it's net and deliberate, usually a black-tinted filled epoxy. There are a few glues that will give a black line anyway (just look at some plywood) but to give a deliberate one, epoxy is the favourite. You can fill it and colour it (artist's acrylics) without distrubing the glue strength.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Contrasting veneer.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"J. Dent" wrote:

What Andy said re the boxes. The black lines between boat planking are different. Instead of attempting to create a perfect edge butt joint between two planks, the edges are planed on a slight bevel, so that when the two planks are fixed to the frames, an open Vee-shaped joint runs the full length of the planks. This is then sealed by caulking the joint by driving in oakum (dunno what the modern equivalent is - the old boys used to use worn-out ropes which were cut to convenient lengths then teased out) with a hammer and a wide blunt chisel (caulking iron).
To stop the caulking working out and to seal things, a layer of pitch or tar was run along the joint after caulking, which is what gives you the black line between planks.
The whole purpose of the system was to allow the planks to work as the ship flexed with the wind and waves, but to keep water out at the same time.
You'll get a much more detailed and erudite explanation if you take a look at Dave Fleming's website.
http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
Even if you're not that interested in caulking, it's a terrific read about the life and times of a traditional boat-builder. I just wish said boat-builder would get off his semi-retired boat-building butt and write a few more tales - you listening, Dave?
Cheers,
Frank
--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 8 Nov 2004 13:01:12 -0000, "Frank McVey"

Ah, I had fun working on that site for Dave. He's a great guy.

I think you'll have to ask him over on abpw. He doesn't have time or patience to follow the Wreck any more.
--
The State always moves slowly and grudgingly towards any purpose that
accrues to society's advantage, but moves rapidly and with alacrity
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

Thanks, Larry
--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not sure about the bandsaw box you described, but a typical teak boat deck would be installed much like a regular outdoor patio deck where you use a small spacer between the boards. The space is then filled (on a boat that is) with a polysulfide caulk which is usually black.
Do you have a link to a picture of the box you're talking about?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The picture is in a book called the Art of Making Elegant Jewelry Boxes written by Tony Lydgate. (Sterling Publishing Co. Inc, New York) Pg 55 is a picture of a Bristlecone Pine Box by Paul & Cinda Brimhall of Colarado. The curved drawers shown are re-glued with the black filling in the joins. Because the joins are both straight angles and curved I think the black caulking seems like the answer. It looks very neat and intentional. Thanks, Jaz Also it's a great book anyway.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry I meant to say epoxy as Andy Dingley suggested, not caulking. Thanks, Jaz

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It sounds like you're describing this:
http://www.leighjigs.com/photo.php?idg
It's a wedged tenon. The mortise flares out and the tenon is split down the middle. Then a wedge of dark contrasting wood, like ebony, is hammered and glued in the slot cut in the tenon. Then flush cut and sand.
brian

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Very small chamfers at the board edges before glueup. The black line is either a shadow, stain or collected grime.
BW

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...
In addition to the other methods posted there is a much more difficult way to achieve a similar effect, as with dovetail joints.
For routed dovetails this can be done like this:
You make one side of the joint, say the tail side, and then make a mating piece of a contrasting wood as a stub, just long enough to hold the pins. Glue that together, trim off the excess of the stub and then route new tails inside of the pins using a smaller dovetail bit and match that to the final pinboard.
I've seen boxes at woodworking shows that were done that way to show the capabilities of fancy router jigs.
--

FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.