bizarre jointing/planer results... what happened.

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Belt drive or chain? I wonder if the belt is slipping at a certain point, or a gear missing a tooth or two?
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On 3/27/2014 4:23 PM, Dave Balderstone wrote:

belt, and it's in good shape.
--
Jeff

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On 3/27/2014 10:07 AM, woodchucker wrote:

...
What kind of dimensions we talking here between "waves" and height/depth thereof and what kind of material you planing? Does this planer have bed rollers perchance?
I can think of several, one of which is related to bed rollers having something on them that is the counterpart of the one the other poster mentioned on drive rollers.
Another could be a knife alignment if one has slipped slightly lower than the others you're seeing it taking just a little bit bigger bite than the other two (presuming three, one if only two total which will enhance the difference in spacing by 50%).
Adjustable feed rate? Moving faster will leave more surface roughness as the blade isn't in the same spot as long. Remember the knives are on a circular path so they're only at the max depth instantaneously, anyway (iow, the surface only appears flat even if perfect, the actual cuts are overlapping circles). This effect is also bigger w/ only 2 instead of three knives obviously.
Imbalance
Loose head and/or head lock
Various other mechanical failures depending on the particular design.
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On 3/27/2014 4:20 PM, dpb wrote: ...
Oh, and perhaps one of the most likely -- knives (or at least one knife) dull enough to burnish instead of cut cleanly. A little paint thinner on a rag will uncover this real quick--the burnished spot won't suck it up like the cleanly cut sections will...
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Check the cutter head bearings for up and down play, and that all the bolts holding the bearings to the frame are present and tight. It sounds like it is vibrating, or oscillating up and down, either that or the hold down rollers are not putting enough pressure on the wood.
Is there a metal plate that reverses the direction of the chips immediately before the outfeed roller? Any kind of sturdy steel that is adjusted so it barely clears the finished height of the wood after it leaves the cutter head and before the wood gets to the feed roller? If there is, it should be adjusted only a few thousandths above the surface of the wood. I use a piece of copy paper to put between it and the wood, then lower it so the paper can not be pulled out, or just barely pulled out. That must be done every time blades are re-installed, or you can get some bad results. It sounds like the particular piece of wood this happened to had just the right weight, length and flexibility to reach harmonic resonance of each individual blade hitting the surface, which then amplifies as it continues and flexes the wood enough to float the feed rollers up off of the bed. If there was rigid steel holding the wood down, it would not allow it to be vibrated up off of the bed.
Harmonic resonance is a weird thing. FM, to most people. I would venture a guess that this is involved in your problem in some way. If you have a strobe, try it while it is running with the guards off. It might show something.
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Jim in NC


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Could still have to do with weight, flexibility (or lack of it) and harmonic resonance between the blade strikes, the resonance of the wood and the resonance of the springs. Change any one of the factors, and the resonance goes away.
--
Jim in NC


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Maybe you should switch back to the vac for a pass and see if it clears up. On sanders, too much suction can cause the tool to stick to the work. I wonder if something similar is happening here. (Just a guess.)
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"woodchucker" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- I had this problem with a DeWalt, DW-733 at least 10 years ago.
Tech service was aware of the problem and walked me thru the fix.
It involved removing some parts, but forgot what they were.
Lew
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On 3/28/2014 3:50 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I know the feeling.. I can't remember what I cut up some parts for.. Hmmm... maybe a call.. the teflon helped, but now you have me curious.
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Jeff

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