Biscut jointer Q's

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"Jack Stein" wrote:

"CW" wrote:

Time for some definitions.
Jack was commenting on the small dimension of the M/T which I refer to as the "end" rather than the large dimension of the M/T which I refer to as the "side".
Strictly arbitrary, but keeps everybody together.
Lew
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wrote:

Would 1/64" on *both* sides make you happy? That's what we're talking about.

I didn't mean that it mattered. I was just clarifying which dimensions I was talking about.
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krw wrote:

I guess it would depend on how much sanding was needed to smooth things out. I think 1/64th would sand out w/o much fuss.

OK, you made that clear. I was just mentioning what Norm said about side to side clearance in a large, heavy, exterior door. I was rather surprised that he did that. I always use a square mortiser but note that those that use a router generally either square up the mortise, or round over the edges of the tenon to fit the mortise. After seeing Norm do this, and specifically comment that side to side slop was not an issue, I would say putting a square tenon in a rounded mortise would also be a non-issue, but perhaps thought provoking...
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Jack
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Peter Huebner wrote:

I have a PC with some slop in the biscuits. No play in the bearings, sounds like an angle grinder (which is basically what it is).
I'm tempted to take the blades down to my sharpening guy and get them to take a few thou off the sides.
Chris
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I have a biscuit joiner that gets used maybe once a year. It's good for alignment if +- 1/64 is close enough. For edging, such as you are doing, I wouldn't use it. There are more accurate ways. I really don't find the biscuit joiner to be much use.

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wrote:

Seems to be two schools of thought; love 'em or hate 'em. Thought I'd see which side I came down on. What type of joint would you use for edging? BTW, the edge board I'm doing is about 4" wide; a little less after I rip everything down to final size.
<snip>
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"krw" wrote:

Given a choice, I'd use tongue and groove.
Tongue in the wood, groove in the plywood, forget the biscuits except at the corner miters in the wood.
YMMV
Lew
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On Fri, 24 Jul 2009 03:59:55 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

I may do that next time. I'll have to play with T&G techniques. How would you cut them? Using a shaper is cheating. ;-)
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"krw" wrote:

If you ever get a chane to watch NYW, Norn does it with his table saw epuipped with a dado and a sacrifical fence.
That would appear to be about the most simple and straight forward way to do the job.
Have fun.
Lew
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On Sat, 25 Jul 2009 00:18:31 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Hmm, when I watched Norm he always had a specialized power tool to do every operation. ;-)

That makes the tongues easy enough though getting the blade height exactly right would be critical. The same with the groove? The panel on end doesn't sound fun.
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"krw" wrote:

It's a piece of cake, have done it several times.
The plywood will be some bastard size, thus a digital vernier caliper is a must to accurately plane the wood to match the ply thickness.
Set the dado to 1/4" wide x 9/32" deep.
Use featherboards as req'd.
Run ply thru them turn end for end and run thru again to center groove.
CUt tongue 1/4" long.
Sneak up on the tongue thickness by setting using a scrap piece and testing scrap piece for fit after every cut.
If it takes more than an hour for the whole thing, you spent at least a half an hour screwing around.
It's just not that difficult a task.
Cutting the mitered ends to size and cutting biscuit slots in the miters is the most challenging part of the project, IMHO.
Have fun.
Lew
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wrote:

I have matching router bits. One cuts the tongue and the other cuts the groove. You have set the height just right but it works just fine.
Max
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wrote:

twice.
Some time back I tried that with a RAS and a "glue joint" cutter in a molding head. Not so easy.
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krw wrote:

Glue joint cutters are a PIA to set up exactly right. I quickly learned they are not needed, nor are splines, biscuits, dowels or anything else when gluing up panels. I've done all those methods except the biscuit joiner. Considering some of the people that love a biscuit joiner, I haven't ruled them out, just that for me, as much as I build these days, doesn't seem worth the trouble or expense. I never had any trouble simply using clamps and cauls. I never had a glue failure in a simple, butted glued up panel or table top so the only use for me would be as an aid in alignment. I can certainly see some value in that aspect, but NOT if I also need to use cauls. I would expect the biscuit joiner to eliminate the need for cauls, otherwise, the cauls eliminate the need for a biscuit joiner:-)
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I've done quite a bit of edge joining for making table tops, that sort of thing, and never had a problem with biscuits but I can't recall ever joining anything less than 3/4" thick. For an edge along side plywood I just glue the edge in place. No biscuits, no tongue and groove) No problems.
Max
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wrote:

I was hoping I could use the biscuits for alignment. That's not happening so I might just as well skip them. BTW, the plywood and edging is 3/4" (nominal 23/32").
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Instead of using the front handle of the 557, hold your hand against the top of the fence to secure it down on the ply. If you're still getting too much slop and the edging ends up lower than the face veneer, add a layer of masking tape to the bottom of the fence for cutting the ply. Remove it prior to cutting the edging. This will raise the edging by the thickness of the tape. Be sure to index the 557 from the faces of both pieces. Art
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They were made to do just that job, and does it rather well. Surely you have some scraps left over to test it on first? Just 10 minutes of shop time will allay or confirm your doubts.
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Yes
I thought they'd be more

Absolutely not.
I know the idea is that they expand

Correct
It seems I'm going to have to make some

Probably not but they do.
I would have expected the sound from HF, but not a "high end" jointer like the

These days PC is middle of the road. I have 2 PC plate joiners. If you want "high end" look at Lamello. Lamello is about the only "high end" plate joiner.
http://www.lamello.com/en/products/wood-joining-system.html
I can't feel any slop in the bearings so I don't think this

Biscuits tend to be extremely inconsistent in thickness.
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wrote:
<snip>

I'm a little familiar with it. The PC wasn't cheap (over $200) and I am a disappointed in its operation. It really does sound like it has bad bearings. My guess is it's a cheap worm gear in the right angle drive.

They all seem sloppy.
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