Bike wheel for a bandsaw..

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Deleted the portions that I'llnot comment on.
The consistent tracking of a blade relies on a crowned surface. You can do this?
Frank
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I think you are courting disaster if you try to Rube Goldberg this tool. If you can't afford to get the real and correct part, then you obviously can't afford to own and use the tool. You should just sell it and go watch TV.
Frank Boettcher wrote:

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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 06:55:05 -0500, mapdude wrote:

Thank you for your input.
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wrote:

able to produce something AS good as the original - and as safe.
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 06:34:20 -0500, Frank Boettcher wrote:

To be honest, I don't know. *But*.. what I was planning to do was use two- part epoxy to fill the rim in and to overflowing, then sand it to either flat with a tyre on or crowned if it's soft enough to cope with the teeth.
TBH making a plywood wheel is looking easier, especially since I still have the useable axle and bearings from the original wheel.
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The crown is important. The blade tracks to the usable portion of each wheel primarily by trying to climb the crown to the apex but being just on the edge of being able to do so. Without the crown the blade just keeps going in the direction it is heading, off the edge of the wheel.
Frank
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Actually, the blade does climb to the apex. And whenever the blade is pushed off the apex, the crown causes the blade to tilt slightly and climb right back to the apex.
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 16:18:10 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@mail.fiawol.org (J. Cochran) wrote:

The blade running exactly on the center and top of the crown on both wheels is more a matter of random chance than design. When manufactured there is a tolerance zone actually measured with a gage when the machine is "tracked" on the assembly line. If the blade is within the gage limits on both wheels, that means that the machine will properly track the largest blade the the machine is designed for.
It is not uncommon for the blade to run slightly off center on both wheels on opposite sides when the blade is properly tracking.
My comments are on the manufacture of Delta domestically produced units, I'm not familiar with others but think most are done in the same manner.
Frank
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RE: Subject
The Good news: It would be a rather straight forward procedure to construct a wheel using a plywood core, fiberglass side walls and tread along with the reuse of the existing spindle.
The Bad news:
It is a VERY time consuming task.
Bottom Line....................................
I know how to do it but wouldn't.
Led
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Out of curiosity, why do you need fiberglass side walls?
I know people make high speed dust collector fans out of plywood, I would think a slow speed band saw wheel would hold up just fine, probably a lot better than the plastic wheels he currently has?

I often thought of building one of those plywood band saws but since I already have a good band saw, I probably won't. I'd like to have a giant resaw band saw, dedicated to resawing, but...
--
Jack
http://jbstein.com
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<snip>

Yep.. my thought, also..
I decided that if I ever did that much resawing, it would be fun to build a horizontal BS like a metal cutting one... Sort of like a big-assed chop saw but with a BS blade and wheels..
The priority is so far down the list that I've never even drawn one.. lol
mac
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"Jack Stein" wrote:

It simplifies construction.

If you are referring to the kit from Gilliom Mfg, I built that saw.
Gilliom supplies die cast 18" dia wheels as part of the kit.
--
Lew Hodgett
Box 2302
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

OK, but seems just the opposite to me.

Yes, something like that. Like Mac though, for me it's down the priority list enough I'll never get to it. I'd have a better chance of stumbling over a nice used one than building one I guess.

If they supplied just the bearings would you have any qualms making the wheels out of plywood? I still think plain plywood would be simpler than building high speed radial fans for dust collectors that many seem to have built out of plywood. Even I have some reservations about that, but I'd do it if I had to...
--
Jack
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"Jack Stein" wrote:

For me, NBD, but see below.
If you are going to use plywood as a core, then you want to totally encapsulate it with epoxy and fiber glass.
The plywood is now totally sealed, and you are no longer dealing with wood other than as a core material.
If you want to make an 18" wheel, laminate a couple of 19" dia pieces of 12mm, 4 ply, CDX plywood together with some TiteBond II.
(You can use deck screws as clamps, just sand down the tips when finished and leave them installed)
When cured, drill a centered thru hole with a hole saw that is 2-3 times the dia of the axle.
(My guess is that 1-1/4 or 1-1/2 would be about right.)
Close the bottom of the hole with masking tape, lay flat on table, and pour in about 1/2" of micro-balloon thickened fairing putty and let cure over night.
Next day, remove tape, mix more thickened putty, and fill both sides proud using a putty knife or equal to apply.
When cured, sand putty smooth on both sides, then apply a layer of 17OZ, double bias glass on top side and let cure.
Next day, glass other side.
When both sides are cured, sand glass with some 60 grit to remove any drips.and overlaps around outer circle edges.
Center drill a thru hole for the axle.
Notice that you have just drilled thru glass and putty, but the plywood is still sealed.
Using a router with a 1/2" carbide straight bit and a radius jig, trim wheel to 18" finish dia.
(Buy a new, low cost carbide blade, use it, then toss it because the fiberglass will have destroyed it.)
Glass the tread with some 6 oz, glass tape, 2" max width.
Glass 2/3 of wheel at a time.
When cured, rotate wheel and finish.
When cured, sand overlasps smooth, then tape again until you have 3 layers of glass tape.
Trim off excess glass with a sander.
You are now ready to install axle and rubber for tire.
Balance as required.
As I said, straight forward construction, just a PITA to do it.
--
Lew Hodgett
Box 2302
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On Fri, 18 Jul 2008 02:44:45 +0000, Lew Hodgett wrote:

<Snip complete howto>

Yes, but... given that this bandsaw will be sat in the same place where I store my wood, and isn't subject to the raw heat of Arizona or the bitter cold of Alaska, why *shouldn't* I just take the much simpler route of just making it direct from plywood and varnishing it?
I can that your route makes it virtually indestructible and it will last forever, but if it's 1/4 of the work to make it from raw ply then it can wear out four times before I break even...
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"PCPaul" wrote:

Knock yourself out.
Lew
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mac
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Probably true, but being paranoid, I rather not be using the saw when one wore out/broke up...
I guess finding a junked saw the same as yours with one good wheel isn't an option?
mac
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Didn't Inca bandsaws have flat wheels? IIRC they recommended running with the teeth hanging off the edge.
Chris
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On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 14:41:11 -0600, Chris Friesen

I don't know.
Frank
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