Big time gloat sorta OT

Page 1 of 2  
I just got the deal of a lifetime today, I literally walked into this one, Someone returned a generator to a local store, well the store was marking things down to get rid of the returns as is. I asked how much for the generator and the guy said, "I don't think it runs, so give me 50!" I thought what the hell, I mean this thing looked just out of the box. I bought it, turns out the people who bought it only got it to power their house because of a prolonged outage due to storms. They just said it didn't work right to get the money back. I got it home pulled the cord and it purrred like a kitten, I plugged in a few things they too worked, then I put the power demand to it and it still purred. SO I think this qualifies a a high end gloat....
Rich
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Great find, I've thought about getting a generator at times, but cannot justify it from experience with power outages. For $50 I'd grab it.
But sad in a way. Your good fortune is because of some low life twit that took advantage of the generous return policy of the store. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Free rental army. It costs us all in the end. When there was a tremendous rain storm in the Chicago area about nine years ago (17" in 24 hours in my town), a lot of homes got flooded. A couple of Home Depots wound up with dozens of wet/dry vacs that clearly had been used once only to clean up a house and returned. To add insult to the process, the (ab)users didn't even have the decency to clean them up.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and probably add in a few more for good measure. Yes, we will all end up paying for them, but it doesn't hurt HD any.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My next door neighbor had his sewer back up on him yesterday. The plumber came today and fixed the problem. My neighbor wanted to borrow my wet vac if I hade one. I though to my self, do I want to lend him my wet vac to suck up sewerage from his floors? Noooo.. I only have a shop vac, I told him. Go and rent one was my answer. He went to HD and bought a wet vac, did his work and indicated that the shop/wet vac was not to expensive and he would "probably" keep it. "PROBABLY KEEP IT"?????? I said to my self, you "probably" deserve what you got, backed up sewerage in you house. I wonder how many other times he has done this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I had a guy working for me that did this regularly with his portable powere tools... I dunno, I just wasn't brought up like that.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can totally understand taking something back if it did not perform to its expectations but if it does work as advertised and you use it, keep it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How quiet is it?
Never mind, it could be pretty darned loud and still not drown out the giant SUCKING sound!
Good gloat!
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You know, if you put a Clothes dryer plug on the generator, plug it in where the dryer would normally plug in, TURN OFF your main breakers, you have power anywhere in your house if there is a power failure. Just be sure to Turn OFF the main breaker.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, actually I didn't know that. Is it really that easy? I do have a 240 receptacle on the gen. Rich

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are a bunch of caveats:
1) it's *dangerous* *BAD*THINGS* happen if the generator is plugged in _and_ the utility power gets connected.
2) If you're inside any sort of 'civilization', it's probably contrary to building/electrical code.
3) Unless it's a _honkin_big_ generator, it's way too easy to overload it with the 'household' load. This can result in no power in the house *and* a dead generator.
*IF* you're planning for 'house power', for extended utility outages, invest some money, and 'do it right'. That means: 1) Run a sub-panel for the 'critical' circuits. 2) Feed the sub-panel from a single big breaker in the main panel. 3) Install a 'transfer switch' between the main panel and the sub-panel. 4) Connect the generator as the 'other' input to the transfer switch.
OTOH, for those who are the 'live dangerously' type, the following sequence of steps should be followed _exactly_, *NO*EXCEPTIONS*. There are multiple reasons why things are in the order they are -- ranging from a danger of burning out the house wiring and blowing the generator, to minimizing the instabilities resulting from abrupt load changes on the generator.
Before starting, make sure that the outlet you intend to use for 'feeding' power to the rest of the house is the _only_ thing on the associated breaker. If not, *DON'T*USE*THAT*OUTLET* -- find a different one.
When the power goes out: 1) turn off the main breaker -- Note: chief city electrical inspector      here says that the 'normal' 100A/150A/200A breakers are _not_      intended to be used as 'switches'; that a relatively small number      of such cycles (like in the 'low tens' of times) can render it      ineffectual as a breaker. 2) turn off _all_ the individual circuit breakers 3) *PLUG*IN* the generator to the house wiring -- unplugging the      dryer, or other device, if necessary. 4) *START* the generator, and wait for it to stabilize. 5) turn _on_ the breaker feeding that outlet. This applies power to      the entire 'bus' in the panel. 6) turn _on_, *one*by*one*, and waiting at least 10-15 seconds between each one, the *MINIMUM* number of 'critical' circuits you need      to power.
     You have an upper-limit on the load capacity, set by the 'dryer      circuit' wiring, and breaker. If your generator has a lower      'steady load' output than that, then the generator is the      limiting factor. GENERALLY, it's a good idea to keep the total      rated capacity of the 'switched on' circuits under 150% of the      "limit".
When 'utility' power is restored -- something you have *NO*WAY* of telling about, "in house", then you: 1) turn -off- the 'critical' circuits, one by one, waiting several     seconds (3-5 is sufficient) between each one. 2) turn -off- the breaker feeding the outlet with the generator. 3) stop the generator. 4) DISCONNECT the generator from the house wiring. 5) turn -on- the main breaker. 6) turn -on- all the individual breakers, one-by-one, waiting 5 seconds     or so, between each one.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That is why I twice indicated to not forget to shut off the main circuit breaker. If you don't the generator would probably quit running immediately as the strain of trying to power the neighborhood would surely bring it to a stop.

Perhaps but the use of an extension cord is against code in many cases.

As long as everything is turned off that would be a big drain there would be no problem.
The whole mention of this by me was to point out that it is more conveinent to energize the whole house and not have to bring extension cords to the generator to run things like the freezer and or refrigerator in the event of a power failure plus a few lights.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, since my house was built in the 1800's, I don't think that I am going to take the chance of just pluggin in my gen, Since power outages here are few and far between and I can live without TV I will just run the gen to the fridge and freezer and some lighting.Maybe one day I will go to the trouble of putting in a transfer switch.
Rich
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 03:04:15 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:
snip stuff about hooking up a generator to backfeed a panel

I was wondering about that. do circuit breakers work in reverse?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 06 Jul 2004 21:07:03 -0700, bridger wrote:

Welllll, since any current flowing through them reverses 120 times a second...
-Doug
--
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange apples
then you and I will still each have one apple.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is there a reverse with Alternating Current?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 04:06:51 GMT, "Leon"

apparently. otherwise, why polarized plugs?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that has something to do with the ground. I could be wrong. IIRC you do not see male polarized plugs if equipped with the 3rd ground prong. I know that it does not matter how a switch or appliance operates even if you "force" the incorrect union of this type of plug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The idea of a polarized plug (and yes, even three prong are polarized, it is just not necessary to use a wider blade since the plug can only be utilized in a single manner) is so the device can distinguish reliably between the grounded, grounding and current carrying conductors.
This is not generally for operational sake but rather for safety sake. Consider older Television sets, for example, where the grounded (neutral) conductor is used as a frame ground. If you plug it in backwards, the frame becomes energized. Note that this configuration is no longer allowed, but older devices still exist.
Or look at a lamp socket. Typically the shell is connected to the grounded conductor and the inner button connected to the current carrying conductor. Only the conductor connected to the 'button' is switched, so if, for example, it were plugged in backwards (or the outlet was miswired), the shell will be energized all the time - be careful changing that light bulb......
Moral? Don't defeat the polarization and buy a $5.00 tester to check the polarization of all the outlets in your home.
scott
for reference:
grounded conductor == neutral == white grounding conductor == ground == bare/green current carrying conductor == black/red/etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Handy information Scott. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.