BIG shellac project

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J G wrote:

Shellac is an evaporative finish and does not cure. Additional coats can be applied as soon as the solvent evaporates completely.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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"Nova" wrote in message

Without blushing?
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J G wrote:

I do most of my finishing in my basement where I have a hard time getting the humidity below 60% even with a dehumidifier running full tilt 7/24. I've never had a blushing problem. I will note that I only use dewaxed or decanted shellac though.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Only if I'm naked when applying it. Ed
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Oh, it's you! <G>
How'd the pine floor come out? Have you been riding much down there?
Barry
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"B a r r y" wrote in message

Aye, just getting settled in the new homestead, and getting my net accounts set back up.
> How'd the pine floor come out?
Pine was the walls, Oak for the floors. It's not up yet, schedule got a bit whacky in the last two weeks, between finishing the house, work, college, and moving the contents of the house South.

Recently, no. But the new house is 1.2 miles from Stanky Creek. It isn;t any FOMBA but it's as close as one can get in this flat-land.
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You won't need to wait that long between coats. Two hours max. The reason to allow shellac a week or so to dry is to let it get hard enough for rubbing-out. As for application, you'll want to use a wool applicator like you would for applying Mop-n-Glo (said to be shellac-based). Just lay it down in smooth strips... no wiping back and forth and such. You can fix problems later with a wood-backed sanding block.
Refinishing, whether in five years or a hunnert, will be the same. Sand smooth and apply more shellac.
O'Deen
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...
I've never finished anything large with shellac, so I really can't help you. Except to offer a bit of advice that may be obvious -- make sure you have good fresh shellac. This is brought to mind by finishing on a little project I'm currently working on. Nice little birdseye maple box with handcut mitered dovetails and a raised panel top.
This evening I spent stripping the old gummy soft shellac and getting ready to order a new batch. &^%*#$
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