BIG edge jointing problem

Page 2 of 2  

I guess that leaves the Ryobi.
Always looking for a worse solution, H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pocket screws to pull them together. Only use lag screws instead; it'll pull in very nicely. Also saw the joints about a half degree off square in a "valley" fashion so the top & bottom edge pulls together tighter when you draw up the pockets. EAsyu to do that on a table saw with that thickness wood. Glues better, too. Use a really good glue; expensive but worth it.
Portable bench, eh? <g>
HTH,
Pop
: Big in the sense of the boards (timbers?) involved. : : I'm trying to edge join the two boards for my bench top. Each board is 80" : x 3 1/2" x 7". They're big and I need to join the 3 1/2" edges. : : Here's what I've done. : - Got the faces flat and square by using long 4" wide strips of plywood : screwed to the sides to form a sled. Ran it through the planer to flatten a : face, then removed the strips, flipped the board and flattened the opposite : face. : - planed one rough edge down to mostly flat (so the bit wouldn't have to : take a big bite in the next step) then laid the board on its face, screwed : one of the straightedges to the face (actually the bottom face so the screw : holes will never show) then used a pattern cutting bit (bearing on the top) : to true half the thickness of the edge. : - Removed the strip, flipped the board and changed to a bearing on the tip : bit in the router and rode that bearing against the edge created in the : previous step. : - I did this to each of the two boards thinking that I would get a nice : mating surface. What resulted was not bad, but not the tightness that I was : expecting. Would like to get these tighter and some solutions (like adding : clamp pressure to draw the boards together during glue up) simply won't work : given the size of the boards. : : Any ideas? : : By the way, I'm going to use a full length 3/4" plywood spling during glue : up. Also, the gap on the edge at it's max is about 1/32, although most : spots are less or touch flush. : : tia, : : jc : :
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, It'll be portable. I'm gonna move it from where it's being built in the center of the room to against the wall where it's going to remain until the next millenium.... LOL!
I don't think I'll use the pkt screws, but I kind of like your idea of the 1/2 degree off square. I'll let you know how it works.....
jc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:59:56 GMT, "noonenparticular"

I use an aluminum straight edge screwed down (upside down actually) and the tablesaw. Fine tuning with a hand plane if necessary.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
noonenparticular (in 0HvBf.16328$ snipped-for-privacy@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net) said:
<snip> | - I did this to each of the two boards thinking that I would get a | nice mating surface. What resulted was not bad, but not the | tightness that I was expecting. Would like to get these tighter | and some solutions (like adding clamp pressure to draw the boards | together during glue up) simply won't work given the size of the | boards. | | Any ideas?
For my first workbench I planed 4x4s and also used splines; and drilled 1/4" holes through all boards except the first and last. The first and last were drilled _almost_ through and I cut an slot from the center botom to intersect the 1/4" blind hole. At assembly time I used threaded rod, washers and nuts (and every clamp I could get my hands on) to draw the whole thing together. For the first year, once every month I used an open-ended wrench to tighten the nuts.
I was happy with the result. When I sold the house, the buyer agreed to my price - but only on the condition that the bench stay with the house. I guess he liked it, too.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:59:56 GMT, "noonenparticular"

Something like this might work? http://www.grizzly.com/products/G9968
I don't have one. If I want to do work like that one time only, I take it to someone who already has the tools, and there are two sources around here. Look around and you'll find some one in the wood retail business reasonably close.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guess who wrote:

If you're going to suggest expensive tools....why not just use a jointer? The following 16" jointer costs about as much as what you suggested and has about twice the length (since the shaper fence is only half the length of the table).
http://www.grizzly.com/products/G9953
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's on my birthday list, Chris.....
jc

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
While we're tossing out ideas, here's a couple untested concepts - both would require some effort...
1. How about not trying to move the big lumber, but the tool instead? I might have missed this suggestion with all of the others so far... You used a similar technique with the planer. - Clamp your boards solidly together, 'joint' side up - Create a 'runners' out of smaller boards that you can mill accurately and locate them on each side of your lumber - Create a carriage for your router that slides along the rails, but moves back and forth as you go down the length trimming both boards flush - Accuracy here is very dependent upon your sled setup
Wood magazine suggested a similar setup for those who had a router, but not a planer, but it might work here
2. Another option would be to not try to cut through the entire piece, but leverage off of the dado that you plan to use for the spline, a couple different flush trim bits, and sacrificial splines. Note: the flush trim bits must be the same size OR the one with the bearing on the router side must be larger - Cut a dado in both of the long boards - Cut a (hardwood) spline and joint or plane it to a slightly thickness LESS than the depth of your dado - Use your router and a flush trim bit (bearing on the end of the bit) to make a clean edge on both sides of the FIRST board - Cut another spline that is just a little larger than the depth of your combined dados PLUS the width of your second flush trim bit (with the bearing on the router side) - Place the sacrificial spline in the FIRST board -With the second flush trim bit (with the bearing riding on your lumber) cut a groove in the spline deep enough to use as a reference for the first bit - Either move the sacrifical spline to the SECOND board or attach them together (depending upon the size of your bit) - Use the groove in the sacrifical spline as a reference to cut a matching face to the original - You may need to repeat this process for the second part of the SECOND board.
My $.002
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.