better bandsaw cuts

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Is there a trick to making more accurate bandsaw cuts? Try as I might, when I cut pieces out there is small ups and downs along the cut line. I try to go slow and stay on the line or along one edge of it but stil end up with some hills and valleys. My bandsaw blade is quite thin, may 1/4", do you suppose going to a thicker blade would help?
Thank you.
II
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Maybe. What are you cutting? How many teeth per inch on the blade? Has the saw been set up properly to track straight? Are the guides set right? Bearings? Are you cutting freehand or using a fence?
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Wider blades generally provide for straighter cuts. You also need to adjust your fence for blade drift.
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"You also need to adjust your fence for blade drift." ********************************Fence? Blade drift?
Not related.
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You don't think? I read that as the cut was not following the line.
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Leon wrote:

I saw that too, second time around. I'm sticking with the first interpretation!
er
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I read 'blade drift' to mean the blade was not cutting where it was pointed at. This can be caused by a crooked or bent bade, a blade with too much pressure on the rear bearing, too little blade tension, or the workpiece is not flat or warped, the cut closes as it is cut, any number of things besides the fence. If you cannot hold the piece against and follow the fence, t is not a blade problem
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You probably read correctly.
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I've also just read that another cause is because only one side of the blade (the inside) is against the wheels. The outside of the blade never rubs against anything - that can make the inward set teeth wear differently from the outward set teeth.
On Mon, 17 Apr 2006 13:52:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (RM MS) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

A deeper blade helps, yes. You should be able to get pretty smooth cuts even with a 1/4" blade though, with only light planing necessary to smooth it. I think the main purpose of a deeper blade, though, is to keep the cut straight.
If you aren't getting that now, and don't want to buy a deeper blade, there are a number of things you can look for to get a smoother cut, including reducing vibration in the saw, ensuring the guides are properly set to limit lateral movement of the blade, checking the wheels for dirt, making sure the drive train is balanced, and properly tensioning the blade. Fussy, innit?
er
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On 16 Apr 2006 16:16:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

You always will. It's not a finishing blade as in a TS. That's why sandpaper was invented.
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Well, I have to admit that the saw does vibrate ALOT and that I haven't checked the guides for lateral movement in some time. I think there may be something to comment about it being partly the saw too. This bandsaw is really cheap model from Sears and leaves much to be desired! I will take a look at all the things you guys have mentioned.........you are a great help, thank you!
II
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Or it could just be the bandsaw... I used to borrow a friends when I needed a bandsaw and could never cut anything straight, or accurately follow a curve. I figured bandsaws were over rated. Then I bought my own. It cuts straight when I want it to, and follows curves pretty easily. YMMV
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Check your blade tension first. If it's not set for your type blade i. e. 1/2, 3/8", etc. your cuts will be crappy.
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Bandsaw is not meant to be a precision machine, but some consderations may help: Smooth weld on the blade, no kinks, go SLOWER, go EVEN SLOWER, keep bearing close to the job. Use spindle sander after. LOL
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I know you use big industrial band saws but I have seen band saws do some pretty precise resawing and ripping. And by precise I am comparing to my TS that typically leaves no tooth marks.
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I never said you cannot do some nice work on a bandsaw. We also use smaller ones, but as has been related here, everyhing must be pretty shipshpe to get a nice finish, and it will never be as nice as a planed or scraped surface, nor was it ever intended to be.
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Agreed.
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Where are you located? It sounds like you could use some help to take you to the next level. I am outside Seattle and would be happy to give you a hand.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Do you mean...
1. that the cut wanders from the line? That's your fault.
2. that the cut isn't smooth? That's the way bandsaw blades cut - rough from the tooth marks. But the roughness should be easily removed with sanding/scraping. If it is rougher than you think it should be, make sure the blade tension is right and try different feed rates.
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