best wood for tiller

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I'm gonna make a new tiller extension handle for a club's sailboat. What's the best (and cost effective) wood to use? White oak? I'm thinking teak might be too $$.
Thanx Renata
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Renata wrote:

If you can protect it from water damage hickory or ash would be good.
Otherwise, aside from teak and white oak, you might consider black locust, or osage orange, if you can find it.
--

FF


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wrote:

Should be laminated for strength. Most are made from Ash or Ash and Mahongony alternating layers of laminate.
Frank
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Well, you left out a lot of details that might make a diff. For example, what kind of boat? Classic wooden? Racing dinghy? Oldie but goodie clorox bottle? Not that you will lose sleep over the decision but form follows function, right? An extension is not a tiller but is used when holding onto the tiller itself is either awkward of disadvantageous to performance when racing. If you are making an extension I suggest you scratch the idea and invest in an after-market one instead. Among the benefits of these are a wide array of lengths and materials (carbon-fiber, alloy, fiber-glass) as well as design (think telescoping). My tiller extension folds back nicely on the tiller and is held out of the way with a clever grip.
Now if you are not discussing an extension, but an actual tiller, then my suggestion is that you try to mimic the original design. Most naval architects take pains to work out even the smallest of details, including the tiller. As for material, heck you aren't making an heirloom here. I would not worry too much about laminating something as it is not going too buy you a whole heck of a lot. A stout piece of white oak with a good varnish (I like Captain's, YMMV) on it should serve you well. And when the varnish fails and the oak turns black it just adds character. Sand off the varnish and redo for the pleasure of adding more "character" to your tiller. And last but not least. remember that the tiller must attach to the rudder somehow, and where it does is your most likely source of failure so pay particular attention to reinforcing this area. I used 1/4" SS angle iron - it worked great for 10 years and for all I know may still be working now, 15 years down the road.
Have fun and good luck ...
Renata wrote:

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Tiller. Not extension. 26' Windrose. A speedy, nimble craft (not!).
Thanx for the wealth of info.
I intend to copy the form of the original. It's oak I think (I don't have it at the moment). White oak is what I was thinking, but wasn't sure if there was a better choice. And for this boat, my plethora of other projects, the $ (gratis), etc., I'm gonna stay away from laminating.
The rest o the story is that the boat had a run in with some rocks after getting cut off but a tourist boat stopping to take 'pitchers' (yes, I know,...). Turning to port ran you head on into the wind, and starboard was the lighthouse - with the notso-nice rocks. The helmsman did what he could but still "brushed" the rocks. No, I wasn't sailing it, but I belong to the club which owns it and offer my services to make the replacement.
BTW, the tiller cracked at approximately at the half way point, lengthwise. Don't know if it runs the whole length, but from the pic I saw, it runs for a good bit of it. I'm presuming we'll reuse the hardware, etc. from the broken tiller (including the extension). ANy reason not to?
Renata
wrote:

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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------050305090705060402090904 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Sorry to hear about the mishap - I have had similar experiences myself ... I would reuse the original hardware - as long as it is not suspect in anyway. Heck, you might even be able to salvage the tiller depending on how bad it is cracked. Ordinary carpenters glue might work for you. You could always put some SS screws in it if you feel the glue would be insufficient. And the suggestion that you buy an OTC replacement may be heresy, but the price of your time and materials will probably greatly exceed the cost of a fairly good tiller. If this is a labor of love then that's another story.
Renata wrote:

--------------050305090705060402090904 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> <font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif">Sorry to hear about the mishap - I have had similar experiences myself ...<br> I would reuse the original hardware - as long as it is not suspect in anyway.&nbsp; Heck, you might even be able to salvage the tiller depending on how bad it is cracked.&nbsp; Ordinary carpenters glue might work for you.&nbsp; You could always put some SS screws in it if you feel the glue would be insufficient.&nbsp; And the suggestion that you buy an OTC replacement may be heresy, but the price of your time and materials will probably greatly exceed the cost of a fairly good tiller.&nbsp; If this is a labor of love then that's another story.<br> <br> Renata wrote:</font> <blockquote cite=" snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Tiller. Not extension. 26' Windrose. A speedy, nimble craft (not!).
Thanx for the wealth of info.
I intend to copy the form of the original. It's oak I think (I don't have it at the moment). White oak is what I was thinking, but wasn't sure if there was a better choice. And for this boat, my plethora of other projects, the $ (gratis), etc., I'm gonna stay away from laminating.
The rest o the story is that the boat had a run in with some rocks after getting cut off but a tourist boat stopping to take 'pitchers' (yes, I know,...). Turning to port ran you head on into the wind, and starboard was the lighthouse - with the notso-nice rocks. The helmsman did what he could but still "brushed" the rocks. No, I wasn't sailing it, but I belong to the club which owns it and offer my services to make the replacement.
BTW, the tiller cracked at approximately at the half way point, lengthwise. Don't know if it runs the whole length, but from the pic I saw, it runs for a good bit of it. I'm presuming we'll reuse the hardware, etc. from the broken tiller (including the extension). ANy reason not to?
Renata
On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 18:53:26 -0400, DIYGUY <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com">&lt; snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Well, you left out a lot of details that might make a diff. For example, what kind of boat? Classic wooden? Racing dinghy? Oldie but goodie clorox bottle? Not that you will lose sleep over the decision but form follows function, right? An extension is not a tiller but is used when holding onto the tiller itself is either awkward of disadvantageous to performance when racing. If you are making an extension I suggest you scratch the idea and invest in an after-market one instead. Among the benefits of these are a wide array of lengths and materials (carbon-fiber, alloy, fiber-glass) as well as design (think telescoping). My tiller extension folds back nicely on the tiller and is held out of the way with a clever grip.
Now if you are not discussing an extension, but an actual tiller, then my suggestion is that you try to mimic the original design. Most naval architects take pains to work out even the smallest of details, including the tiller. As for material, heck you aren't making an heirloom here. I would not worry too much about laminating something as it is not going too buy you a whole heck of a lot. A stout piece of white oak with a good varnish (I like Captain's, YMMV) on it should serve you well. And when the varnish fails and the oak turns black it just adds character. Sand off the varnish and redo for the pleasure of adding more "character" to your tiller. And last but not least. remember that the tiller must attach to the rudder somehow, and where it does is your most likely source of failure so pay particular attention to reinforcing this area. I used 1/4" SS angle iron - it worked great for 10 years and for all I know may still be working now, 15 years down the road.
Have fun and good luck ...
Renata wrote: </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I'm gonna make a new tiller extension handle for a club's sailboat. What's the best (and cost effective) wood to use? White oak? I'm thinking teak might be too $$.
Thanx Renata </pre> </blockquote> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>
--------------050305090705060402090904--
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What kind of boat is it? I've got a tiller (with cover) sitting in my shed for a Catalina27. I used it one season and then Isabella sank it. I guess Davy Jones wasn't happy about me changing the name.
Email me if your interested. It would be a whole lot cheaper than building/buying a new one.
Mark
DIYGUY wrote:

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Thanx for the offer.
It's a 27' (I think) Windrose. Looks like the tiller's just a tapered hunk of wood (I haven't been out yet this year, so I'm going by the partial picture provided).
Where are you and how much (if it would work)?
Thanx Renata
wrote:

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I paid $130 for it and $25 for the cover. It also has a stainless Universal Joint (360 degree spinning eye bolt) for a Spinlock tiller extension. (I think that's around here somewhere too. I'll have to take a look.) The cover has some wear on it, but the handle is pristine. I can let you have it all for $100. If you email me, I'll send you pictures of it and dimensions.
Oh, I'm in Northern Virgina.
Mark
Renata wrote:

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THanx again.
I don't think the tiller's salvageable as the crack runs it's length and I wouldn't trust a salvage job in that state. Easy enouhg to replace. I think they're gonna glue it as a temporary measure til the new one's done.
It's sorta a labor of love, but when one poster mentioned $50 for a replacement, well, the love sorta diminished... ;-)
Thanx Renata
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Oak can be difficult to glue, using epoxy (which is what you'd want to use for anything marine, of course). So if you need to assemble anything to it (cheeks or whatever), you'll probably find mahogany to be easier to deal with.
OTOH, if it's just a case of pulling out a spokeshave and shaping a single piece of wood, I don't see why oak would not be a suitable choice.
John
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Renata wrote: > I'm gonna make a new tiller extension handle for a club's sailboat. > What's the best (and cost effective) wood to use? White oak? I'm > thinking teak might be too $$.
Sounds like a sailor.
Just because the wind is free, dosen't mean everything else is to, as the old saying goes<G>.
If you are going to laminate it, as someone else suggested, ash and Hondouras mahogany will make a nice combination.
Not a good place for teak IMHO.
Lew
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I use a treated piece of 2/4 ( for 2/6 if you want to shape it).on mine. It is very cheap and fits into the holder perfectly.

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PHILISTINE !!!!

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Tue, Jul 11, 2006, 11:13am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com (W.Wells) doth burbleth: I use a treated piece of 2/4 ( for 2/6 if you want to shape it).on mine. It is very cheap and fits into the holder perfectly.
It would make make me extremely uneasy to knowingly use a piece of treated wood in such a manner. Not because of woory it would break, but because of the potential health hazard from constant skin contact with treated wood.
You want cheap, use pallet wood.
JOAT Politician \Pol`i*ti"cian\, n. Latin for career criminal
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To continue on Lew's suggestion . . .
Laminating up your own tiller isn't hard . . . just time consuming to do it RIGHT.
I was planning on doing one for a 15ft 'micro-cruiser' {the 'original' looked like it was simply a painted piece of cut down '2x4'}. I had recently gotten several current 'Marine Supply' catalogs and browsing through them noted that SEVERAL had beautifully, professionally laminated, tillers for $50 or less. . . . In various curves & styles, as well.
My suggestion is to look at the Hendersen Marine, Jamestown Distributors, and Annapolis Performance Sailing web-sites before building your own. {ALTHOUGH . . the trouble to build a jig is worth while if you are going to make MULTIPLE tillers}
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

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wrote:

Time consuming is what I can't afford at the moment. I'm willing to do this for 'em/us but have only so much time. Plus, the boat's not such an elegant creature as to warrant a hand crafted work of art, so to speak.

Ah, thanx, will look into these sources. A quick internet perusal yielded prices starting at $125, ranging to $230 plus.
$50 would be worth buying since the wood and varnish will run close to that $.
THanx Renata

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Sounds like someone with a camprehension problem. In what way does "cost effective" mean free? There are many airlines that think the Boeing 747 is cost effective. Do you think they get them for free?

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CW wrote: > Sounds like someone with a camprehension problem.
Obviously not a rag bagger.
Lew
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Cost effective example.
Ebony $65/bd ft. Nice and hard, but not sure how it holds up to salt spray.
Rosewood $15/bd ft. Beutiful and elegant but not sure how structurally appropriate it would be.
White oak $5/bd ft. Durable, appropriate, cheap (relatively).
Not sure where you got "free".
Renata

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