Best wood for splines?

    --I'm planning to attach some pieces via splines, as biscuits would be a real pain in this application. Sooo what wood will work best as the spline material?
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : A steaming pile of
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : obscure information...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steamer wrote:

Same as the stock is best...
Specifics????
--


Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steamer wrote:

--
©Russ

"Praise Jebus!" - H. J. Simpson
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think there's much of a problem with species, just a design choice of color. Will the splines be visible? For some applications, a contrasting wood works nicely. Also, I was taught to use a cross-grain spline, which means that the grain of the spline runs perpendicular to the edge you're gluing. This is because a spline is much easier to break with the grain than across it. If the spline is hidden, you can also consider plywood.
todd
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not so important, but use a hardwood. I use whatever scraps I can find around the shop. Make the spline with a perpendicular grain to make a stronger spline, although this is more difficult to make for longer splines.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it doesn't show, what's wrong with 1/8th or better ply? Running the grain of the plywood properly, of course. Tom
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Running the grain of the plywood properly, of course. Tom

Now *that* was funny!
JC
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe wrote: > tom wrote:

Why? Most thin plywood has very thin face layers, and a thicker middle layer. The ideal spline would have the face layers parallel with the grain of the boards being glued, so that the thicker middle layer is perpendicular to the grain of the boards being glued.
Chris
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was looking at from the basic plywood construction technique of alternating layers in all directions. Wasn't thinking about really thin plywood, but then, the op didn't specify a thickness.
I still think it was funny, whether it was meant to be or not.
ymhav,
jc
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I understood that too. But, orientation of the face grain of plywood IS important. For a subfloor, the recommendation is to orient the face grain across the joists. That is, for normal 4 x 8 plywood the 8 foot length spans the joists. That is supposed to be 15% stiffer than the other orientation.
There are also plywoods made with the face grain running in the 4 foot direction, and 45 degrees to both edges.
--
FF


Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

Subfloor ply is construction material, and has different construction than hardwood ply. Among other things the face plys are quite a bit thicker.
I have 1/4" hardwood plywood which has only three plys--the thin face plys and a much thicker inner layer. In this case, the ply is much stronger perpendicular to the face grain.
Chris
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oops. From now on, I'm gonna check actual stiffnesses. Have to watch for that. Thanks. Tom
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I think you're right.
Sometimes 1/4" hardwood plywood has a non-wood core.
--
FF




Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.