Best wood choice for untreated siding?

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how do the cement board products hold up in the north? I recently did the siding on a house for a guy that had moved up here from Texas, and he insisted on a cement product. Nobody I spoke with up here had ever used it, so I did a bunch of research, got the appropriate waivers, and installed it. So far I haven't had any call backs, but then it has only been a year......
-_JD

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"jd" wrote in message

As long as you installed it correctly, you will have no callbacks ... nor will your grandkids.
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Last update: 5/6/06
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As long as they never own a ball - of any kind - that can be hit onto the board with sufficient force...
Damn, Swing, are you only building in Adult Communities these days?
I don't know how many cementitious boards (glommed up with asbestos in those days) that I have replaced because they have broken at the edges under force.
Are the new products that much better?
(ain't a challenge - just a question)
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message

Hey Tom ... IMO, Yes. I've not had a single installed Hardiplank siding break on at least a half a dozen houses where it's been installed thus far, including mine.
It simply has not been a problem, and even more remarkable since most of those were built using vent skin construction (you guys may call it "rain skin" up there) where you would expect it to be a problem, versus applying siding directly to the sheathing. (I don't allow the cornice crews to blind nail in this application, use double nailed, 4" wide, furring strips for added support with the extra surface area, and have the painters putty fill the nail holes).
I also use the Hardi products almost exclusively in interior areas where we used to use greenboard ... behind tubs/showers, back splashes, and anywhere tile or stone is laid.
Peace of mind for the builder, and a long lasting, virtually maintenance and mold and mildew free exterior/interior for the owner.
I was drug kicking and screaming to the technology, but have been become an evangelical convert. ;)
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Shazzam!
I may have to look into some of this stuff for my own homestead.
Thanks.
BTW
Ain't you s'posed to be fondling the Fretless tonight?
How come you got Friday off?
Regards,
Tom Watson
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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"Tom Watson" wrote in message

That would have been last night ... we played for a Mensa conference. Funny, I feel much smarter, and richer, this morning.

Musician's union rule on three day weekends ... you can only work three of the days and two of the nights. ;)
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I was a bit concerned about the broken edge problem too but found that the Hardiplank siding I installed on my house is very tough stuff. The trim boards can be a problem if not properly (read "evenly") backed up between nails--I broke two corner boards through inattention. I also found that you should not install 10' lengths of perf soffits by yourself (even with cleats) as it doesn't have the structural integrity to be unsupported--broke two of those too. I must say that my biggest single problem was doing the job by myself. Having a helper would have made the whole job much easier!
John
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On 24 May 2006 17:00:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Adam,
I own a summer place in southern Ontario, Canada that's been in the family for just over a hundred years. The climate is very mixed, going from very dry to very wet conditions (we're right on the lake shore, so it often gets pretty humid). One of the cottages, a built out barn, had hand split cedar shingles applied somewhere around 80-85 years ago, untreated then or since. The shingles are still in good shape (weathered to a dark silver/brown) everywhere except close to the ground where they are subject to water splashing from runoff. There they show deterioration; I think more from dry rot (many wet/dry cycles) than anything else. Based on this experience, cedar is certainly capable of holding up well untreated for a long time.
Last week I finally trashed a wheelbarrow that I've had for about 25 years. It had been kept outdoors at my home in Houston (hot/humid), tipped up against the back of the garage. The handles, which I believe were made of Ipe, were rotted at the front end of the barrow from ground contact. The steel of the body an the hardware rusting is what prompted the replacement of the wheelbarrow though. The condition of the handles amazed me. They are well crackled, splintery, and gray on the outside. I figured they were totally deteriorated and took a saw to them to make it easier for the trash guys to take the barrow away. After cutting them off, I started looking at them and found that only the outer 1/16" or so was deteriorated (after 25 years of weathering!). The interior is a beautiful dark red, rock hard wood that has now become small turning stock for future projects. I had heard Ipe was great for outdoor use; this has proven it to me without a doubt.
I think either of these woods would serve you well, and I'd bet the cedar would be a good bit less expensive.
Cliff
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I used untreated cedar shingles 30 years ago on a house that turned brown to gray on different sided of house depending on sun, shade, wind drying the rain water.I left that house10 years ago. My new house house i built 20 years ago I dipped the shingles in bleaching oil and never did anything since. I have more uniform color change now. My trim I used cheap pine and claded with white metal. I have a maintance free exterior. People that said cedar will turn black are proably mistaking cedar clapbords which will look horrible. Find some books on CAPE COD a large island off Massachusetts and you will see the typical CAPE with weathered cedar shingles.
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