Best way to sand drywall

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Float the wall with a "skim coat". It might take a couple of coats, but it isn't too hard to do.
dave
Randy Chapman wrote:

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You've gotten some good inputs on sanding, but are you sure (especially if the paint store has already given you wrong directions once) that you should be sanding? You may want to describe your situation more, and get additional advice.
FWIW, when I took wallpaper off, I skim-coated the entire wall with joint compound, then sanded & painted, to cover damage to the paper surface of the drywall.
John
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John, I did precisely what you told the OP to one of my bedroom walls that had faded wallpaper. Came out great. Nothing like skim coating for renewing a wall surface!
dave
John McCoy wrote:

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wrote:

I like using my ROS for occasional drywall sanding. Why? I connect it to my HEPA equipped Shop Vac, which makes for VERY clean sanding.
Barry
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Mark Driscol wrote...

Are they telling you to sand the wallpaper glue down? That doesn't sound like it will work very well. The glue just doesn't sand that well, and you really don't want to sand the drywall itself at all. You'll get fuzzies that no amount of subsequent sanding will remove.
Do you want a texture or a smooth wall? For a smooth wall, I'd put on a thin coat (called a "putty coat") of mud and sand it smooth. A couple hours max applying the putty coat, with an hour or less sanding the next morning. For a textured wall, it's even easier, since the texture will help hide any residual glue. Just apply the mud in the desired pattern, and again, sand in the morning.
Jim
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Im not sure what exactly you are sanding. Is it remains of wallpaper backing? Are you sanding existing paint off ? or is it just wallpaper paste remains?
In any event, you are looking at sanding a large surface area of crap that loves to clog sandpaper, especially when it heats up under the electric sander.
My experience with this type of stuff is to use a fairly coarse grit (40 -60) to tear the stuff off, (if it is backing) and then re sand with fine grit. If you are sanding stuff that doesnt clog (like well hardened paint) then a finer grit say 100-120 would do. The orbital sanders are the best. The bigger the amperage and pad the better for large areas. For tabletops etc, a smaller orbital is best. I have a 5 in makita that was only $100 and have been using it for years. I really like it, and have dropped it many times without any damage. The Dewalt ones are pretty good too.
I had some heavy backing from a vinyl floor to remove from my kitchen . I have a pneumatic "bondo buster" with 40 grit paper that ripped that stuff off in a few hours. The electric orbital was useless for this. It just depends what exactly you are sanding maybe you need to rent something.
Drywall is not normally sanded with electric sanders because the filler is really easy to sand.
Hope this helps. Chris
On Wed, 15 Oct 2003 07:29:52 -0400, "Mark Driscol"

To e-mail me, remove all of the sevens from my address.
Chris
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wrote:

DO NOT sand sheetrock with an electric sander. They draw cooling air through the sander, and with it dust, which is powdered rock. It will destroy your bearings, quickly. Air powered is not so bad, as the air is not pulled through it. DAMHIKT.
--
Jim in NC



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Morgans wrote:

Use a damp sponge.
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Mark Driscol wrote:

Let's back up. Can you please describe the problem you are trying to fix? If you have just removed wall paper and the wall is uneven you do not want to sand dry wall. Sanding the drywall will damage it. ONe would only sand joint compound once applied to the joints and nail/screw holes. If your walls are uneven you want to apply a skim coat. Basically a thined down jiont compound that is painted on.
jw
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wrote:

I don't know what you ran into or what the paint guy tols you wrong, but this is what I do. Having done this several times myself. Remove the wallpaper then wash down the walls with a wet sponge to remove as much of the old glue as you can. Then fill in any nicks, nail holes or bad joints with joint compound thinned with water until you have a soft butter consistency. Sand your patched areas smooth then apply a primer over the whole wall. Any old glue still on the wall will leave a rough spot you can feel with your hands. After the primer has set up good you can lightly hit the rough spots with a mesh 220 grit sand paper and smooth those areas up. Then reprime and paint.
Gary
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On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 05:26:32 GMT, Gary Harmon

Better yet, wet the sponge with DIF, diluted as per the instructions.
DIF is a paste cutting enzyme, available at any decent paint store or hardware store.
Barry
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I once used a palm sander and came out of a closed room looking like a ghost as I was completely covered by dust. My suggestion >>> DO NOT use a power tool to do drywall sanding!
If you use a powered tool to sand the drywall , you will have small particles blown all over the place. NOTE>>> I am assuming that there are repairs that have been done as well... Either way, if there is any repairs that have been done or there are seams that have been done, there will be the capability to get lots of dried drywall mud converted into dust.
The best tool I have found is something that looks like a sanding block but with material that looks like the stuff from your screen door on it. It scrapes well, and does not blow the drywall dust everywhere... It just sort of falls straight down. There may be better ways but this is the one I found at the BORG. <Home Depot> It is also under ten dollars! Wear a dust mask and safety glasses as the dust is rather invasive...
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On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 12:50:18 GMT, Denis

Next time, hook the sander up to a vac equipped with a drywall bag or HEPA filter. You won't even know you were sanding.
Barry
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"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote:

That, of course, is if you remember to put the filter back in.
DAMHIKT -- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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This is a small palm sander and it has holes on the face fro teh dust to go elsewhere, but no apcific spot for a vaccum attachment. OTOH, I don't have a shop let alone a shop vac... sigh... All my work gets done in the downstairs suite in the kitchen. sucks to be me! I don't have room for any more tools than I have and here I am going to the Wood Hobby show tomorrow and Sunday! <grin>
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In typed:

I bought one of these that had a dust collector port. I hooked it up to my little shop vac and it caught most of the dust. Of course, one should still wear goggles and a mask. Oh, and ear plugs, my little Genie shop vac makes a big vac noise.
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What material is being removed? Did you apply anything after you removed the wallpaper?
NJBrad
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