Best way to sand drywall

Page 1 of 2  
After stripping wallpaper from our bathroom, the paint store gave us some incorrect advise on how to prep the walls for painting. As part of the correction to get it right this time, they now advise us to sand the drywall in the bathroom.
What is the best way to do this? My wife would like to get a sander she could use for other things as well, like sanding tabletops for resurfacing. Should we get a random orbital sander or some other kind? Would this be good for drywall as well? What brands/models/features would be good? Going to the home improvement stores there are many choices, and we're novices at this.
Thanks in advance for any advice.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hand sanding is really the only way to go since drywall mud requires such a light touch. Seriously, this is how the pros do it. Get yourself a drywall sander and a pole to put it on and some fine sanding screen and hit it very lightly otherwise you'll be taking the mud off and the paper will show through. Probably cost about twenty bucks. You might even have enough left over to get the wife a sander.
Kevin

drywall
resurfacing.
Going
at
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A sponge and warm water will work great for this, just if it's wallpaper just wet it down and wait until it softens up, if it's joint compound it will sand quickly as you rub it is a circular motion. I use the 9" x 4 3/4 x 1 1/2 size sponge.

drywall
resurfacing.
Going
at
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DAGS for alt.home.repair as it's discussed often it seems.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Driscol wrote:

Drywall is basically big plaster sheets with a thin paper coating, and more plaster (i.e. joint compound, aka "mud") applied in and over the joints between the big sheets. So, as others have already said, you want a light touch, otherwise you'll go right through the paper coating and in to the plaster. My guess is that what the paint store is telling you to do is to sand off any residual glue and bits left over from the wallpaper you removed, and level out the surface before painting. I think a random orbital sander might be too heavy-handed for this, although I admit I haven't tried it myself. If you do go this route, I'd recommend getting a smallish one, and starting out slowly on a small area to find out if you're tearing up the drywall before going to town with it.
I recently discovered a shop-vac drywall sanding attachment. This thing is great. It's basically just a rectangular plastic do-hickey(tm) that attaches to the end of your shop vac hose. Over that, you attach an abrasive sanding screen/mesh. You then hand sand with it, as you would with sandpaper wrapped around a sanding block. However, because it's attached to your shop vac, you get virtually *no* dust. I was amazed at how well it worked. My SWMBO was extremely paranoid about dust when I drywalled her office, since she had had a contractor pretty much cover her mom's house with dust while doing drywall years ago. She practically made me move everything in our house in to storage and seal off the room before she would let me sand the drywall joints on this one wall. =-) Well, there was so little dust with this thing, that she was certain that I hadn't actually sanded it, but used some sort of black magic to put the drywall up with smooth joints in the first place. I didn't need to clean up any dust after I was done, really, it worked that well. Highly recommended, at least if you're sanding the joint compound.
(Later that day, while trying to empty the shop vac in to the trash, I managed to knock it over, thus filling my workshop with the aforementioned dust, but that's a whole 'nother story.) ;-)
- Jeff
--
==========================================================================
Please remove "ziggzigg" from my e-mail address if replying by email.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is
================================================= I second that. I had a small job to do that was dust sensitive and bought one. An added advantage is that the amount of suction you use, will control how much pressure is applied to the wall.
--
Jim in NC



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Driscol wrote:

I have used a ROS to sand drywall compound and it is overkill. need to use slow speed and fine sandpaper or the paper on the drywall is gone in flash. Drywall sanding screens are a big improvement over hand sandpaper as they don't clog as easily and the job does go rather quickly. If it is glue and wallpaper you are sanding down then a ROS might be a little better but you still have to be very careful
BRuce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
drywall can be sanded (well actually the "mud") with a pole sander and mesh. HOWEVER, IF you have a cool shop vac like a Fein, with a 1 micron filter or HEPA filter option, then you can hook it up to a powered sander like a 1/4 pad sander and get no cloud of dust in the room! I did exactly that when finishing the walls of my shop. I first sanded with a hand held pad; made on hell of a mess--huge clouds of dust. I rigged up an adapter to my PC 1/4 pad sander so that I could use my Fein vac. Voila! Sanding is easier, faster, and most importantly, DUST FREE. Very little time and pressure is required to get a flat seam. You can use either drywall sanding mesh, or drywall sandpaper. I like the mesh for initial sanding--it is aggressive.
dave
Mark Driscol wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Driscol wrote:

A VS ROS at a slow speed with 150 grit should do the trick, but I would do it by hand (unless I could borrow the PC wall sander from someone). Be very careful to sand only to smoothness. If you oversand, the problem isn't that you will sand through the paper layer, but you will make the paper fuzzy. Paint WILL NOT hide this fuzz. Regards, Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
a 1/4 pad sander is a LOT easier to get FLAT seams with than a ROS...
Henry St.Pierre wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bay Area Dave wrote:

BAD, The OP is not sanding newly taped sheetrock, but is sanding sheetrock from which wallpaper has been removed. The removal process usually leaves glue residue and bits of crap on the surface. That is what the OP is sanding, not the mud seams. Regards, Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
then he should be doing a skim coat.
dave
Henry St.Pierre wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 16 Oct 2003, Bay Area Dave sez:

    BAD advice, as usual. Only a person with experience and skill can lay a thick enough skim coat on a surface with raised bits of wallpaper, glue, nubbits of texture, or whatever, without leaving more of a mess than he started with. Where there once was a nubbit, there will be a long ridge. The float will pick up detritus from the wall, and redistribute it, probably contaminating the bucket of mud in the process.
    I have been restoring plaster and sheetrock walls for many years, and I don't touch the mud bucket until the walls are free of debris and nubs. Anything else is just making more work.
Scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Scott Cramer" wrote in message "The float will pick up detritus from the wall, and redistribute it, "
We always alled those "Hitch Hikers"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bay Area Dave wrote:

Sorry Dave, I was wrong about what the OP did to the wall. Seems like he primed it. How to fix? Don't know without seeing it, but a skim coat would be a bitch without a smooth surface to start with. Probably would still sand. Hank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

drywall
Slightly OT, similar question: does the same answer apply when you wish to get rid of the crappy texture someone sprayed on, or is a RAS or (powered) finish sander better for this?
--randy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ceiling popcorn, scrape with a wide knife and respackle.
Anything else is anyone's guess. I've had success skim-coating with slightly thinned lightweight drywall compound. You might wanna try painting over it and see if you don't mind the texture.
And if all else fails, a wrecking bar and new rock.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ceiling popcorn is removed by spraying it with water, letting it soften, and then scraping it with a scraper attached to a pole so you do it standing on the floor instead of ladder (unless you've got impossibly high ceilings, in which case, my condolences...)
dave
Charles Krug wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No worries about my ceiling; I can stand on the floor and scrape it -- 7.5 feet :-(
Sadly, though, this is the wall. Skim coat is out, we're not talking a little texture here, we're talking stuff that sticks out 1/4" in places! You've seen the ice cream ad on TV where guests are afraid of the wall -- that's our place. I was hoping to avoid the wrecking bar and new rock, but, alas :-(
--randy

some
to
(powered)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You an always knock down the big stuff and over it up with 3/8"

the
wish
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.