Best way to remove studs attached to stucco?

I need to replace some of the 2x4 studs in an exterior load-bearing wall in my garage. Drywood termites have invaded and chomped the insides of several of the studs. (I think the studs are redwood) Even though I had a termite control company treat the studs with Cy-Kick, the studs look pretty bad from over 40 years of various holes and termite treatments.
The challenge will be to remove the old studs one at a time. In running a putty knife behind the studs, it appears that nails were used to secure the wire mesh, which is a backing for the stucco. How can I cut through these nails without damaging the stucco? At best I might be able to get a hacksaw blade behind each stud, but it's going to be slow-going. If I cut the nails, will I somehow weaken the stucco wall?
Also, does anybody know of a source in the SF Bay Area for pressure treated DRY lumber for interior applications? All I see are soaking wet pressure treated stuff for outside use. It's so depressing:-(
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I suppose you can cut the stud at the sill and top plates with a sawzall, then section the stud into 18-24" pieces with the sawzall. Unless they used ring-shank nails to nail the mesh to the studs, you should be able to pull the stud sections straight away from the stucco.
You may also need to support the top-plate with a hydraulic jack to prevent any settling while the stud is being replaced. (you can bore a suitably sized hole in the end of a 4x4 that a bottle jack will fit into - the 4x4 should be short enough to reach the top-plate with the jack sitting on the sill plate).
Do this _before_ removing the old stud.

Why replace with pressure treated? Wouldn't it be more effective to address the path the termites used to get to the stud in the first place?
scott
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Just a thought but............could you put new studs next to the damaged studs (treated obviously) and leave the old studs in place. Not trying to be a smart aleck......I am sure you have reasons for removing the old studs. With good termite control, there should not be a problem with leaving the damaged studs in place. You will have to use long nails or srews to attach the new studs to the old loadbearing joists, driven at an angle to make a good attachment. Just my two cents worth. Good Luck Lyndell

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be
That was exactly what I was thinking.
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Yes, particularly with the expectation of quake "disturbances" it would be best to leave as much "fixing" from the wall covering to the framing as possible. Abatron's "Liquid Wood" in the old studs would also maximize what the termites have left you.
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On Tue, 20 Apr 2004 00:20:37 GMT, "Lyndell Thompson"

Yes, many people are suggesting the same thing. And perhaps this is what I will do. One of the reasons for my wanting to remove the old studs is that I'm not quite sure all the drywoods are gone. I had a "localized" treatment, which consisted of the exterminator drilling small holes into the wood, until he hit a pocket where the drywoods existed. Then he injected the Cy-Kick. It's a very random thing. The only real way to know that all the drywoods are killed is to tent the entire house and fumigate with Vikane. Very expensive. And tenting will probably be the next course of action in a few years.
Drywood termites have a very limited area of the country where they attack wood. Unfortunately, I happen to live in that area. Drywoods do less damage and aren't as aggressive with wood as the more familiar subterranean. According to my exterminator and all the literature I've read, there is little one can do to protect and prevent against drywood termites, other than to use California redwood, Southern Yellow Pine, or pressure treated lumber. And even then, these bugs have been known to munch on this stuff too. Even the tiniest entry point is enough for them to get to the wood. The only thing about drywoods is that it takes them a long time to do real damage, unlike the subterranean or the dreaded Formosan, which can turn a whole house to sawdust in a month's time. Here are links to the wall in question, and a closeup of the "pellets" the drywoods produce:
http://img1.photobucket.com/albums/v40/Hreodbeorht/wall.jpg
http://img1.photobucket.com/albums/v40/Hreodbeorht/closeup.jpg
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You still need to provide support for the stucco screen. If there is enough of the old studs left, this problem is solved. If not...     j4
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wrote:

Trying to understand better... if you have to run a putty knife behind to find the nails, then they don't go through the stud, or you'd see them. So what is the worry about? Just remove the studs and the nails should hold.
If the nails do go through the stud first, then place a support material [a square of wood] on the side where the heel of your wrecking bar will exert pressure. This distributes the pressure over a larger area, like a snowshoe. There will be some touch-up in any case. This is how I removed wood door framing in an old house that had lath and plaster walls [and we still live in it.]
Dan.
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My first thought is to sister new studs next to the existing ones and leave everything in place as other have already suggested. However, instead of wood how about using steel studs?
If you absolutely have to get the old studs out you could try the method I observed a carpenter do once in Tucson. Fit a hacksaw blade into a sawsall and slip the blade between the stud and the wire mesh of the stucco. Hook a strong bungee cord to the free end of the hacksaw blade to provide tension as you cut and to keep the blade from kinking between the stud and the saw. You'll need a helper to pull on the bungee while you make the cut. There are usually galvanized staples holding the mesh to the studs and they are easily cut with a hacksaw blade.
You will need to secure the wire mesh to the new studs. If you use nails or pound anything in place you risk damaging the stucco. You're better off using construction adhesive or screws.
Art

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Ask this question in alt.building.construction
General practice in earthquake zones is, sister new studs next to the damaged ones, if there is enough mass left in the old studs (if as you mentioned, Redwood, there should be) then you can attach the sister stud to the top and bottom plates AND to whatever is left of the existing stud with construction adhesive and screws/nails.
Separating the stucco mesh from the studs will weaken the stucco considerably.
Dave

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- Nehmo -

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per blade
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You're neglecting to consider the cost of the cleanup materials needed for the blood and eyeball juice
Nope.
He's right, cutting the nails with a metal blade is the easy way.
To the original poster, best of luck, and let us know how it comes out!
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