Best way to fix stripes in baltic birch

The following illustrates the problem:
http://alan.firebin.net/images/cab_stripes1.jpg
http://alan.firebin.net/images/cab_stripes2.jpg
It was suggested on another mailing list to just sand the ply. I would rather find a conditioner or like to know if I cut Zinser 3lb clear shellac down to like 1/2# or 1/4# if that would "solve" the manufacturing problem when the sheets were made?
These are the inside of drawer holders, and not going to be seen. Thanks Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Admitedly this dialup guy didn't wait for them to load completely, but are you referring to the case-hardened areas (lighter, because less absorbent) left you by the big drum sander? If so, try setting them up with water prior to sanding.
An alcohol-based sealer would help on two levels, slowing absorbtion in the non-burnished, and giving a mild water set to the burnished and hardened.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doesn't matter, I'm on a 6-7 MB/s unrestricted DSL "test line", with it's own OC3 back to a Global Service Provider POP, and it still took a long time for the photo to paint. <G>
It's CLASSIC birch blotch.

I always seal birch with full strength Seal Coat, and use high quality Behlen's or Mohawk stains, which are dry brushed to even them out. It would have prevented this problem as well.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is a sanding problem. A conditionaer/wash/sealer might help a bit but sanding them out is the only real solution.
You can use a rag with mineral spirits to wipe the raw boards and see what they'll look like finished, always a good step before staining. As you sand out the bumps, you can check your progress by wiping again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

looks like the factory drum sander marks to me. go out and get yourself a good random orbit sander. I have the PC right angle one- it works well, as do some others.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This one needs some experimentation. The main issue is the type of stain you're using. In general, that shellac washcoat you're suggesting will help, and will probably do better than most conditioners. In general with this issue, I take some scrap first and give it a light coat of 1/2# cut. Then give 4/5 of it another coat, then 3/5 another, and so on. I'll then apply the stain and make a judgement. In a few cases, enough shellac to stop the problem also results in the stain being too light. When that happens, I'll seal with more shellac, and convert the stain to a toner and apply that. If you have little or no pigment, that's the easiest way. GerryG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.