Best way to drill a 1" hole through 2" thick maple?

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On 9/3/14, 9:55 AM, Brewster wrote:

That's very similar to how I enlarged a hole in tile using a diamond hole saw.
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-MIKE-

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On 9/3/14, 11:52 AM, Swingman wrote:

But how in the world do you keep that bit from flexing? :-D
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wrote:

I think I'd use the final size drill to drill a shallow hole - 1/8" deep would be enough, then drill a through hole with the smaller drill. Finally, go back to the full-size drill, and use the shallow hole to position it correctly.
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Peter Bennett, VE7CEI Vancouver BC
peterbb (at) telus.net
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On 9/3/14, 12:11 PM, Peter Bennett wrote:

That's a great idea for those without a drill press and/or way to clamp to the press' table.
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JB Weld :) Plus some duct tape.
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dadiOH
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"-MIKE-" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------------- If the quill of your drill press provides enough stroke to allow changing bits without moving the piece, you are good to go; however, if not you introduce another chance for error.
Since we are only talking about a 1" dia. hole in a 2" piece of stock, why fool around with it?
Make once pass as fast as possible with a forstner to minimize heat build up and get on with it.
Lew
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On 9/3/14, 3:41 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

> If the quill of your drill press provides enough stroke to allow

Just give it up already. I offered advice that works and is a good technique. You keep trying (even in this post) to come up with bullshit reasons why you think something I've done successfully and with great result dozens of time won't work. Just stop. It's embarrassing.
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-MIKE-

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I could buy that. I just do not see the need. A Forstner bit is going to trim the hole to the size each time it is withdrawn for chip removal and goes back in again. What is to be gained by changing sizes, then?
And yes, I have forstner bits starting at 1/4" and going up to 2 3/4"ths, I think. I still say that using my drill press or yours, it will chatter when starting a hole without wood on the center of the bit.
--
Jim in NC


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On 9/3/2014 10:24 PM, Morgans wrote:

If not using a DP a smaller diameter hole will be much easier to drill. Not as much pressure needed to push the bit through. Not all forstners are created the same, especially the inexpensive ones. The less material that the bigger bit has to remove the less effort and heat build up.

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+1
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On 9/3/14, 10:24 PM, Morgans wrote:

If the stock is held securely, ie: clamped, it won't chatter unless there's something wrong with the tools or set-up. If the table is not 90 degrees to the bit, I could see this happening. However, I have started plenty of holes at angles where the pilot section of the Forstner bit did not engage, just the cutting edge, and the entry was clean and smooth.
I wish people wouldn't jump to conclusions in here instead of speaking from experience.
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I've got the smaller Forstner set from Lowes. For $20, it's hard to go wrong.
I've had the set a couple years now, and have successfully dulled the 3/8" bit and the others probably aren't as sharp as they used to be, but for the hobbiest woodworker such a set will be usable for a long time. (Longer if you learn how to sharpen them.)
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 9/4/2014 5:08 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Replace the dull one with a quality bit and you may never have to resharpen it. I have a set that is 30+ years old and the 1-3/8" bit I always used to drill holes for Euro hinges, hundreds, still works pretty well.
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On 9/4/14, 5:08 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

If they have the smooth cutting edges they are surprisingly easy to sharpen with small files. I've sharpened the serrated edged bits, too, but not nearly as well.
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On 9/4/14, 5:57 AM, Leon wrote:

Plus you get a nice burnished, pre-stained surface from the burning bit. :-p
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-MIKE-

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On 9/4/2014 9:27 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

No, still no burning, but it is important to spin these sized bits <400 RPM
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On 9/4/2014 9:27 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

A sure way to detect/find your way to a construction site during trim out, _with your eyes closed_ , is to follow your nose, using the smell generated by a dull router bit being used by an onsite "craftsman".
;)
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Just Wondering wrote:
>> then get one. Get a set. 14 forstner bits for $49.97 on Amazon.

------------------------------------------------------------------- "Puckdropper" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------- IMHO, if you used the money to light cigars you would get more bang for your buck than buying either of the above.
This set was $89 when I bought it, now $145.
http://tinyurl.com/p728l29
Best money I ever spent for cutting tools back then.
Probably still is today.
Add a quality set of brad point drill bits to cover 1/2" and smaller and your done.
You only cry once.
Lew
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On 9/4/2014 1:07 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/COLT-5-Star-Brad-Point-Bits-Inches-HSS-Germany/products/725/
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On 9/4/2014 2:10 PM, Swingman wrote:

Yeah buddy! Colt 5 Star brad point bits may very well be as good as a Forstner bit in 1/4" and larger sizes. I know that in 1/4" and larger you don't need a backer board to prevent tear out on the back side of a of the hole. It is some times hard to tell which side the hole started vs. penetrated.
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