Best way to cut vertical slots through round posts?

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Wood Guy wrote:

Being raised on a horse farm and having used many types of fences, he may want to rethink the round posts and the rail dimensions, unless he wants to put up electric wire on the inside.
Those proposed 1 x 6 rails will not hold up to the inevitable horse shenanigans ... ideally they need to be 1 1/2" thick and that will obviously impact your plans to cut "slots" in your posts.
I like square posts for a wooden horse fence ... it is easier to replace the inevitable broken rails if you nail (galvanized) them on. It is difficult to replace rails that run through a post. I've had to deal with this very thing using concrete posts and through rails, so DAMHIKT.
That said, you usually have to make the mistake to realize the wisdom of experience ...
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"Swingman" wrote... : : Being raised on a horse farm and having used many types of fences, he : may want to rethink the round posts and the rail dimensions, unless he : wants to put up electric wire on the inside. : : Those proposed 1 x 6 rails will not hold up to the inevitable horse : shenanigans ... ideally they need to be 1 1/2" thick and that will : obviously impact your plans to cut "slots" in your posts. : : I like square posts for a wooden horse fence ... it is easier to replace : the inevitable broken rails if you nail (galvanized) them on. It is : difficult to replace rails that run through a post. I've had to deal : with this very thing using concrete posts and through rails, so DAMHIKT. : : That said, you usually have to make the mistake to realize the wisdom of : experience ...
I too was raised with horses and agree with every point Swingman makes. Horses get bored, even in a pasture full of grass and other horses, and will eat any wooden rails provided for their entertainment. They also love to scratch their asses on the fence and I've seen plenty of rough sawn 2x8s broken by them. Fence maintenance was a weekly task until we added a hot wire along each and every rail. No way would I ever consider mortising the rails into the posts on a horse fence. Use really sturdy posts (we used old telephone poles) and spike the rails solidly to them. Art
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Perhaps you need to plane and sand them instead so they are really smooth and unsuitable for satisfying the horses' needs :-)
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Or sand paper and some hot pepper :-)
Martin
Stuart wrote:

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That's interesting. I know nothing about horses, but there are a number of houses around here that have a horse or two and most of them just have barbed wire strung on light angle iron or something similarly light weight. There's one very recent one that put up an electrified wire around most of it, but there is a section where there is just a stone wall that can't be more than 2 feet high, with brush around it but still. I've always found it a bit odd, seems like any of them could get out without breaking a sweat, but they apparently don't.
-Kevin
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They know where the food is.
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O

I suspect they are strung on "T-Posts". T-Posts are an extruded metal shape with a large, flat plate welded along the length and near the bottom. They are driven into the ground so the plate is buried and used for wire fences, usually barbed wire. They might look a little spindly but they are a pretty effective and economic fence system.
RonB
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RonB wrote:
> I suspect they are strung on "T-Posts". T-Posts are an extruded metal > shape with a large, flat plate welded along the length and near the > bottom. They are driven into the ground so the plate is buried and > used for wire fences, usually barbed wire. They might look a little > spindly but they are a pretty effective and economic fence system.
And they make electrical insulators that fit on T-posts nicely for smooth wire, electrified fences ... we used them a lot for temporarily cross fencing a pasture to keep from overgrazing since they're so easy to put up ... a 2' section of 2 7/8 production tubing, with a plate welded across the top, and a couple of U shaped re-bar handles welded to the sides, makes an effective fence post "driver".
Most horses will eventually walk right through a smooth wire fence without electrification, and the propensity of a horse to suffer serious injury from fencing being directionally proportional to the horses worth, you really don't want barbed wire around most modern breeds.
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Yes, and this string of posts reminded me of a friend's misfortune last year. One of her favorites was "horsing" around with a mate and fell against a wooden fence. A board broke and partially impaled her in the lower abdomen. She survived with surgery and some very tender loving care.
The more I think about the posted fence plan, the more I dislike it. Labor intensive and dangerous. That's probably why a lot of local horse folks are building the welded fences. Smooth rails with curved transitions.
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(Larry W) wrote:

BTW--Horses are not right bright. If you use barbed wire expect a lot of vet bills for patching up rips and tears. Three or four hot wires on metal "T" posts with insulators is the common fence around here with heavily anchored corners.. Some people put a white strapping tape about 1 " wide above the top wire running the full length of the fence.. Horses and people see the tape a lot easier and learn to respect the fence.
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Some people put a white strapping tape about 1 " wide above the top

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Instead of the white tape --- hang a sign, Like this ! ( some people are born stupid) LOL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tPK5HpfjkA

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"> How would you go about forming these slots? What sort of tool?
Buy the finished poles at the Home Depot or Lowes. I believe they call it a split rail fence and sell the posts and the fence boards, too.
But, as many woodworking enthusiasts, my knowledge of fencing in livestock is somewhat limited. Thus, I would suggest you might Google "livestock fencing installers" to get an idea of what works before "tooling up."
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http://woodworker.com/chain-mssu-889-393.asp

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wrote:

A little square holed wooden jig and a router bit with a collar is what I'd use. Then, maybe a jigsaw or a sharp chisel to square the inside corners. The other alternative if you can get the use of one, is a mortiser.
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On Fri, 09 Oct 2009 15:48:05 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Reread your post a little closer and obviously a router bit isn't going to be much use with 6" posts. The only option I can think of at this moment is a mortiser and you might have to cut from both sides to get a through hole. It's going to be a lot of tedious repetition any way you look at it.
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Six inches deep, six inches long by one inch wide. Three per post. 100+ posts. Need a router bit that will cut three inches deep then a router that will handle it. Also need a double sided jig so you can go from both sides. Then you have to square up the holes. Take about one and a half hours per post.
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Sounds like it's time to visit a post and beam home builder. They have mortisers that look like low spead chain saws.
If it were only a few posts, I'd say use a spade bit in a drill press and a chisel.
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wrote:

Before anyone else screams; it should have been low SPEED chain saws.
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Brad Bruce wrote:

They're call "chain mortisers". Here's a link to one by Makita, the 7104L:
http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?IDW6
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