Best tool to trim top of pine cabinet?


I've got to trim a quarter inch off of the top of a pine cabinet to make room for a new refrigirator. The cabinet sits above the refrigorator. I've got the cabinet section off, and before I have at it with my circular saw, I thought I'd like to hear suggestions on how to make the cleanest cut. I'm looking for a very straight line, with no chips on the edge of the cut. Just to make it difficult, I can't find an exact match for the original stain so it will be difficult to hide any cutting chips or splinters.
I was thinking of using my circular saw with a new blade (what to get?) and clamp a long level to use as a fence, then pray!
Any suggestions woule be most welcome.
-john
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and
It sounds like you're looking for the safest, surest and cleanest way to trim it. A circular saw might come out fine, but it makes for a high speed "oops" if anything goes wrong. Since you have an orginal finish you want to preserve, I think the safest surest way would be to use a hand plane. It will definitely give the cleanest edge. It won't take long at all to plane off a 1/4" on pine.
Bob
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[...]

... but since this planing would be on end grain it takes longer *and* he risks breaking of large splinters at the end of the plate...
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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writes:> ... but since this planing would be on end grain it takes longer *and*

not a problem breaking things off if done properly. I find it hard to believe the whole top of the cabinet would be all end grain ... strange construction.
Bob
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Quarter inch? Router with a flush trimming bit. Preferably down cutting. Fast, easy, clean.
Max D.
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Check that. Use a pattern bit. Follow a straight edge clamped to the cabinet. (I'm still a little sleepy this morning after staying up late working on some cabinet doors) <G>
Max D.
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http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip022500wb.html
is the safe and easy way to make a "small" cut. You could use a router or circular saw depending on what you have.
John wrote:

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I had to do the same thing when we bought a new refrigerator. I used the flush trim method and that worked except I couldn't get to the ends because the router didn't have enough room. So I finished up on each end with one of those Japanese pull saws very carefully. It looked very nice and the only thing I had to finish was the bottom of the cut. Then it wasn't noticeable.
After I pushed in the new refrigetor no one could see my pains taking work because the refrigerator sticks out 10" farther than the cabinet. I am 6-3 and I am the only one in our house that can see it when I stand up on my toes.
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John wrote:

I'd take the doors off and run it through the table saw using the fence as the guide. It would be similar to cutting the top off a large box.
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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(snip)I'd take the doors off and run it through the table saw using the fence

How many guys do you think it would take to run a refrigerator over a table saw? ;) --dave

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And would that justify an upgrade to a cabinet saw? ;-) - Patriarch
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 17:48:57 -0500, Patriarch

It's Tuesday in Italy. Time to upgrade to a cabinet saw.
I'm looking at the Powermatic with the 30" fence option. (right now I can rip about 12", so 30 seems like a pipe dream.)
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On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 15:09:40 -0400, "no(SPAM)vasys"

I'd use the table saw too. I might put a piece of 1/4" or something under the finished front to protect it.
Mike O.
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wrote:

My tablessaw is not that good anymore. I think I may try the router bit on some scrap wood first, see how that goes.
Good suggestions from everyone. Thanks.
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Probably a trim router (which I don't have...yet) and use two passes. It has a smaller base and lightweight for maneuverability. Tack, clamp, or use double-sided carpet tape a straightedge. I think a circular saw would be a bit awkward to use, unless you have a small one. If you tape along the "keep" side of the line, that will help minimize splintering.

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I would use a hand plane, but not just any plane. I would use a long plane, a jointer or jack plane if you can find it. These planes are usually about 12 inches long, and can be as long as 20 inches. This would prevent a problem with the straightness of the line.
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