Best three easy improvements to my shop. How about yours?

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Rich Stern wrote:

Just one. Getting the rest of the family to call it "the shop" instead of "the garage" ie, the place to toss everything that isn't wanted somewhere else. <g> "The shop" is just a one car garage and I've grudgingly allowed a treadmill, freezer and stepper to also occupy the space. ANYTHING else not related to shop work is assumed to have been misplaced in the shop instead of the trashcan.
I had to be pretty ruthless. Boxes of useful stuff, roller blades, etc. went in the trash & were hauled away. ;-)
But then, I've been to any number of US Army "charm schools." Why not put to use what I've learned? <g>
-- Mark
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1. Getting all the bicycles and crap out of the shed, and making it officially a "shop."
2. De-rusting at last (not exactly easy, but cheap) that old Morgan front vise, then flattening my benchtop and grafting a flat hardwood top onto it, then drilling a grid of dog holes.
I can't come up with a #3 because I bought a lathe for Christmas, and I've been too busy covering every surface in my shop with ribbons of wood to use or take care of any of the rest of it. It's a real mess, actually. Turning blanks on my table saw, turning blanks on my workbench, scraps of too-short wood all over the floor. Moved the belt sander onto a stand in front of the workbench so it's close to the lathe... Used all my Scary Sharp(tm) paper to sand spindles and bowls...
It was the best thing and the worst thing I've done in years. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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I'll offer one.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?pageG161&category=1,42401&ccurrency=2&SID I picked up a 12' sho-vac hose + wands for my shopvac at Lee Valley. Now, I don't have to drag my sho vac all over the shop to tidy up. From unther the outfeed table (where my shopvac usually lives) I can just about reach everything.
It's more narrow than a notmal shopvac hose, so it's more flexible, but since it's designed with a smooth interior, it does not take much of a suction hit.
I vac *much* more fequently, now that it's less fuss to get it done.
My only beef with this product is that it could really use a 20" extension so that I don't have to bend over so much to get to the floor.
<<<<< are you listening Robin? >>>>>
-Steve
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I put these in order of how much they added to my enjoyment of using my shop.
1. Proper bench.
2. Proper lighting/electrical work.
3. Acquiring adequate space.
David
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Rich Stern) wrote in message

I piped my compressor which is in the garage into the basement. ran it across one wall with quick disconnect fittings. Love it! Would like to run it across the adjecent wall.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Larry Bud) wrote in message

That is a really good idea. Does it matter what type of pipe you use? Would having about 40 feet of pipe added between a pancake compressor and the nail gun affect the operation, that is, would there still be enough power to drive the nails?
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Do a google search on what type of pipe to use for all the info (not PVC!). As to the effect on your compressor, it just acts like your compressor has a larger tank. Since it will probably be on the downstream side of your pressure regulator the total amount of available air will be slightly less that if it was on the upstream side. Because of this I like to run my piping at full compressor tank pressure and regulate it down at the end where I plug in the air tools.
-Bruce
Jeff wrote:

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if the tank pressure is 125# and the regulator is set for 90#, the small volume of air in the lines is not going to matter one way or the other.
dave
BruceR wrote:

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it doesn't matter where the regulator is as far as available air: there isn't enough volume of air in the lines to matter if it is at 90# of pressure or 130#.
dave
BruceR wrote:

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As long as the pipe is not really small, it would actually act as a extra resevoir and should NOT reduce the power nor the functionality
John
On 11 Feb 2004 13:14:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeff) wrote:

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I'm excluding tools because I'm just starting out...
1. Cabinets. Images available: http://www.geocities.com/jkreusc/
My shop is a 30" wide strip on the back wall of the garage. I live in hail country (Dallas) with no usable backyard for a carport or shed, so the cars have to go indoors. So, this was my first project. I made them with BC plywood for the box, Lowes whitewood for the face frames and doors, a router, and a circular saw. Dadoes, finishing nails, and glue. Every other base unit wheels around (Router table, Dewalt Jobsite Table Saw) The cabinets look amazing and work great, but after reading the wreck I know the finish work is destined to fall apart, especially the doors. (They were mitred and glued with screen stapled into a rabet as the panel. No splines or bisquits. The face frames are butt joint and glue, no M&T, but they have enough finish nails into the box that they should be okay.) Oh well, my skills will be better when they do fall apart.
2. 2 Ceiling fans. Once again, I live in Dallas and work in a garage without HVAC. The ceiling fans at least keep the air moving and add extra incandescent light.
3. Pegboard. How did I live without it?
Top three I'd like to make?
1. Skeeter vac, I'm sick of slathering on OFF during the spring.
2. More electricity. Another couple of 20 amp circuits would be handy. Right now I have 2 separate 20 amps that are shared with the house. Vac on one, in-use tool on the other.
3. A fence and shed for the backyard. For wood storage and lawn equipment.
Jay
P.S. Please don't tell me the DW744 was a mistake. It works great for now and when I get a bigger house and a cabinet saw, it will still be able to be thrown in the back of the truck when I go to the in-laws. Besides, I got it new for $400 at Lowes and it had a mail in for the 18 guage brad nailer.
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snipped-for-privacy@kreusch.com (Jay) wrote in message

So far my best improvements to my basement shop are:
1. Adding 2 circuits of outlets around the walls for a total of 11 outlets. Also one dedicated 220V 30 amp circuit was just rolled next to the HVAC unit (perhaps it went to an older HVAC the prior owners had or something) so I wired it to a plug for my backordered Grizzly TS.
2. Adding 6 flour. light sets to replace the 4 60w bulbs that were there. Wow, I can see all the way to the wall now.
3. I need to build a proper bench to use as an outfeed table for the TS and also for an assembly table.
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: What are your best three easy imrpovements?
Very few of my improvement shave been easy because of the nature of my "basement". It's not really a basement - the foundation was built on rock ledge. I've had to build a platform over the highly sloping rock ledge, and that platform is the floor of my shop.
So my best improvements are:
1) (an "easy") 1" x 12" x 30" pine tool holders held up with French Cleats.
2) doubling then tripling the floor space by building more platform.
3) Adding high quality flourescent lights.
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
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