Best three easy improvements to my shop. How about yours?

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brought forth from the murky depths:

You have more than one blade?

I have one peg for the blade wrench/earmuffs and a couple of brass eyelets hanging from the right extension table but I think a drawer will be more handy some day. It could handle height and angle gauges, too.

Or Dina's cast-arn 3/8-inch-gaper insert.

Never ending, wot?
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REMEMBER: First you pillage, then you burn.
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Sure - love to see a pic.
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On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 15:29:23 GMT, Larry Jaques

I posted a couple of pics to ABPW.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Not long ago, I "discovered" rec.woodworking. I've been using it a ton as reference since then. I've seen several referals to pics being posted at "ABPW". Would someone please explain what this is and how I access it? Thanks.
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alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
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It's another newsgroup. "alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking". Access is just like any other newsgroup. assuming your provider carries the group, that is.
"non-text" stuff is verboten in most "non-binaries" newsgroups, because the files are usually _big_. by convention, almost all the 'binaries allowed' groups are grouped under the 'alt.binaries' hierarchy.
there's also alt.binaries.pictures.furniture.

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You can also access the photos posted to ABPW through a website: http://www.delorie.com/wood/abpw /
Some internet service providers don't allow access to ABPW (I have no idea why). And, for some reason, I'm only able to view something like half the photos posted on ABPW through my ISP. For those reasons, it's handy to have web based access as a back-up. Keep in mind, the website does not list any of the text enties, for those, you have to view the newsgroup, itself.
I hope that helps some folks here.
Rob
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Frequently, alt.* newsgroups are added _only_ when a customer specifically requests it -- too many 'prank' groups in the hierarchy. If it isn't on your server, contact your provider and _ask_ for it.

This is a functionality of the software you use to read USENET.
There are _multiple_methods_ used for 'encoding' non-text stuff.
The 'classical'/traditional method for USENET is called "uuencode" These messages have a line with the word 'begin', followed by a 3 or 4 digit number, followed by the file-name.
With the advent of MIME, which by definition is for _mail_, some people started using MIME's 'base64' encoding in USENET news articles as well.
These messages have 'standard' MIME sub-headers, and a block of base64 encoded data
Then, some *idiots* decided to invent 'yet another method', which they called 'yenc'. They just built the software and uploaded it to various free distribution points. It's supposed advantage over the standard methods is that the actual "messages" transmitted are smaller -- both uuencode and base64 require 4 bytes of 'text' in the message to represent 3 bytes of the actual binary file. Yenc uses 8-bit data, and 'escapes' a few characters that are 'known' to be dangerous -- with the result that if the message passes through a server that it *not* '8-bit clean' (and _many_ news-servers are *not*, even to this day), the message is irreparably corrupted. But, robustness of design was -not- a consideration for yenc's designers. If some part of the 'rest of the world' doesn't behave in accordance with their 'expectations', then "obviously" that part of the rest of the world is 'in error', and it is *their* problem to fix it. People that use 'yenc' encoding are: stupid, ignorant, inconsiderate, uncaring, or some combination thereof -- probably "most of the above". :)
Anyway, depending on what software you use to read news, it may, or may *not*, automatically recognize some/most/all of the above-mentioned encoding methods.
*IF* it recognizes the encoding, then it can 'decode' things to get back the original file . Which it then has to hand off to some form of 'viewer' to display the content. 'pictures' come in a _whole_slew_ of file formats: '.GIF` developed by CompuServe, some compression, limited colors '.PNG' "picture, the next generation" (I'm *NOT* kidding!" a GIF      replacement to sidestep some legal (patent) issues with the      methodology of creating GIF images. '.JPG' "photo-realistic" (i.e. 16million color) images, 'lossy compression',      but compresses to much smaller than GIF files. designed for      'efficient' storage of actual photographic images '.BMP' Microsoft's "windows bitmap" format -- "who cares about file size?      it's quick and simple, and doesn't take much processing" can      easily be _hundreds_ of times larger than an equivalent JPG '.TIFF' a portable specification for high-resolution computer-generated work.      not so good for reproducing actual photographic images '.PS` and '.EPS' the infamous "PostScript", designed for computer-generated      technical graphics. '.PDF' Adobe's 'portable document format', which can (obviously) include      images -- needs "acrobat reader", or a functional equivalent, to      view the content.
and probably at least 50 other varieties.
Not to mention that some people are posting images in "MacroMedia ShockWave Flash" (enhanced web-page add-in) format.
Practically all image rendering s/w knows what to do with GIF and JPG, and almost everything written in the last 5+ years knows what to do with PNG images. For broader coverage, you may have to employ multiple viewers, and/or specialized 'helpers' for specific file formats.
if your newsreader understands the 'encoding', and can recover the actual 'binary', it _still_ has to "know what to do" with that stream of bits. If it's in a file format it doesn't know how to display..... well you won't be able to see the picture. ;)
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On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 15:29:23 GMT, Larry Jaques

Larry -
Couldn't you just use 2 sets of box slides for this? One pair would be attached to the pullout. The outer pair would pull out from the opposite side; when you pull out from that side, the inner pair and the pullout would move as a unit. You would have full extension in both directions, and I think there would be a pretty good detent in the center position, since the standard accuride slides have detents to help keep them closed. You would have to drill the slide component of the outer pair to match the mounting holes in the box of the inner pair. And you would need to keep the profile of the fasteners that attach the box of the inner pair to the slide of the outer pair to a minimum - pop rivets would probably work nicely. Or you could use 1/4" masonite or something similar as an adapter between the outer and inner pairs if you want to avoid drilling and riveting the slides.
If you do know of a slide actually designed to open both ways, please let me know, as this solution obviously has some drawbacks (cost, double slide thickness, reduced load capacity).
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Yeah, mounting pairs to both sides of floating 1x3s might work just fine.

Hmm, you might be right and the standard self-closing detents might be enough by themselves.
--snip--

Don't forget extra weight and complexity.
I asked Accuride's website form for more info and the rep just overnighted (!) a catalog to me. I'll check it out more once my neck gets better. ('Twas Chiro time today after something went wrong on Saturday when stretching to pick up a measly one gallon paint bucket. Go figure.)
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On Sun, 08 Feb 2004 15:29:23 GMT, Larry Jaques

Whilst perusing the Accuride catalog today I came upon the 2002 slide which is used in pass-thru applications such as kitchen islands and medical carts where both sides need access. It has an internal detent in the center which should work well.
http://www.accuride.com/search/results.php?s=2_woodworking&t 02
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On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 01:58:01 GMT, Larry Jaques

Larry -
Thanks for the info, I had no idea they made 2 way slides. Unfortunately, I need something a lot stronger, suitable for very wide and long pull-through shelves. I tried searching the AccuRide site for "pass-through", "two way" and "double sided". I got a couple of hits showing the 2002, nothing else. But anyway, I really appreciate the reply.
(BTW - those guys obviously spent a lot on their site, great info there, but they really don't have it organized very hell. What's with making you choose an industry before you search? you just wind up doing the same search 3 times. Yuk!)
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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On 06 Feb 2004 04:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Rich Stern) wrote:

1) I tried for years to come up with an effective dust collection solution for my SCMS. I've tried using a box behind the saw, etcetera. Every solution either compromised the cuts the saw could make, or didn't do a great job collecting the dust. Well, I finally tried making a shroud out of that flexible plastic that's used for freezer curtains. A couple of hours of fiddling around, and Voila! It works! I now have a dust free miter station. It's a flexible shroud that attaches to the saw and moves with it, and it doesn't restrict any cut (extreme left miter+bevel, etc) that the saw is capable of making. Very low effort for a large environmental improvement, IMO.
2) Mounted my outfeed table top on 28" drawer slides. The table is 28" deep,so when it's pushed in, it doesn't get in my way. When I push it out, it extends out to 56" behind the saw (60" past the blade) which is just long enough to handle 8' stock, and I can move it in and out without even walking around to the back of the saw. After suffering for years with temp supports and and later a large fixed table that took too much room, I'm really happy with this solution.
3) Replaced shelves under my bench with simple shallow pullouts. This was so easy to do it isn't funny, and it improved the cleanliness of my shop a ton, because I can now get a lot more stuff neatly arranged on the pullouts than I ever could on the shelves.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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Tim,
Can you give more details and pics on #2?
Also - where did you get that shroud you mentioned in #1?
Thanks -Rob
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See my reply to Larry Jacques (I accidentally sent this post twice, so it's a prior thread). . Also, I will post a pic on ABPW.

1/8" thick. It comes in 3' wide rolls. They sell it by the foot at Multi-Craft plastics in Portland, I suspect any plastic supplier would have it. I'll post a pic of this on ABPW too.

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I posted a couple of pics to ABPW.
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
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On 06 Feb 2004 04:38:59 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Rich Stern) scribbled:

1. One day I got pissed off at all the extensions and blowing breakers, and installed two new circuits with outlets on the ceiling every 6' or so. Wired like a (Canadian?) kitchen so the two plugs in each duplex outlet are on separate circuits. It helps that the ceiling is only a little over 7' high.
2. Put wheels on my Makita 2040 planer.
3. Put in 4 low temperature 8'fluorescent fixtures. They start up even when the shop is at 20 below (-4F, Keith).
4. Got me a cheap Crappy Tire rolling mechanic's tool box. I keep my measuring tools, sandpaper, drill bits and accessories, ratchet set in separate drawers.
5. Put in a cheap IKEA-style termite-puke bookcase that we had around to keep all my fasteners.
6. Screwed a few 1X3s to the ceiling joists. Great for storing planes, pipe clamps, etc..
Ok, it's more than three but, as you all know, there are three kinds of people, those who can count and those who can't.
Luigi Note the new email address. Please adjust your krillfiles (tmAD) accordingly Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Weegie wrote:

So far I have the one outlet above the assembly area bench but I'm leaning towards another in a spot where the jointer, planer, band saw and An Ultimate Router Table have decided were a good spot to call their home. None get used simultaneously so one circuit should/would work out with a 4-way box.

sigh... I found a nicely constructed roll around rack mount (for A/V devices) for free and it recently began it's new life as a roll around for the Delta lunch box planer.

Sweater weather, right?

Not gone there yet as I have entirely too much/many foot prints already. Maybe I'll have me something once I've eBay'd a few things more. In the mean time, my next big project are some cabinets along two walls with shallow drawers. I calc'd out that two 8'ish cabinets would mean making 60ish drawer/trays. I'm figuring this would be tantamount to going from dirt roads to an 8-lane Interstate (highway Luigi).

Something similar/the same, I made shallow (3" deep) cabinets (from scrap/you don't really even need a back for these) that are sprinkled about the shoppe for infrastructure items. On the up side, I've not had to go digging for anything in the last three years.

Similar but different, we have 3" diameter cardboard tubes left over from our plotter at work. Some of these have ended up in between the joists for holding "better rippings", dowels and anything else that's long and skinny.

The math works for me.
UA100
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yep, I used some leftover 4" light guage PVC leftovers, cut in 6" long pieces and screwed to the joists ~24" apart. any little diameter "good stuff" that will span 2 or more gets saved there.
BRuce
Unisaw A100 wrote:

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(Pictures at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/interest.html )
[1] Moved my shop from an 11' x 18' space to a 50' x 50' space. Now I have to drive 15 miles to the shop; but it's like getting a new lease on life to have the space.
[2] Added a ShopBot PRT-96 (with 5 HP, 0-24,000 RPM Colombo spindle) to the tool set and learned to speak its language (not necessary because its software will work from DXF files; but my programs are interactive, much faster, and considerably more flexible). Now I can work to 0.0015" tolerances (in 3D!) and know that parts will always fit as intended.
[3] Built a dust collection system using the inexpensive HF dust collector, two recycled plastic drums, a pair of cyclone separator lids, and 30' of 4" hose. There's no more haze in the shop and cleanup is a *lot* easier.
[4] Replaced the original Delta fence and miter gauge on my TS with Incra's fence and miter gauge. My old Unisaur suddenly became much easier to use and the accuracy of my work is better than ever before.
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DeSoto, Iowa USA
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